L.A. Times Workers Vote Overwhelmingly for Union

A Message from LiUNA General President Terry O’Sullivan

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Honoring the Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was not only a leader who ushered in a movement for justice, peace and reconciliation, but a man who changed the course of history. As we approach his birthday, it is time to honor his legacy and rededicate ourselves to the movement he helped launch.   To this day, the work Dr. King started, shapes our efforts and aspirations to build a more just and fair world and forge a nation where opportunity and prosperity are shared equally by all.

While all Americans have much to be thankful to Dr. King for, we owe a special debt for the work he did to advance the American Labor movement. Dr. King was firmly committed to the cause of working people and believed that the cause of labor was inextricably linked with racial justice and civil rights. From the first days of the Montgomery Bus Boycott that brought him to national attention, to that tragic night in Memphis nearly 13 years later, Dr. King worked hand-in-hand with local and national labor leaders. Indeed, it was a local leader of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, E.D. Nixon, who recruited a young Reverend Dr. King to lead the Montgomery Bus Boycott. In 1961, he denounced so-called “right-to-work” laws as “false slogans” designed “to rob us of our civil rights and job rights.” 

Great progress has been made in the decades since his death, but there is still work to be done. In Dr. King’s own words to galvanize striking sanitation workers in Memphis, “We’ve got to give ourselves to this struggle until the end.  Nothing would be more tragic than to stop at this point in Memphis. We’ve got to see it through.” We must build on his legacy, speak truth to power, fight for our livelihoods and ensure that workers’ rights are respected.

On behalf of myself, General Secretary-Treasurer Armand E. Sabitoni and the entire LIUNA General Executive Board, I wish you a happy Martin Luther King, Jr. Day weekend and hope that you join me in taking inspiration from his incredible legacy.

LiUNA Local 1001 reaches Tentative Agreement with the City of Chicago

On Thursday, January 11, 2018, after over 10 months of negotiations, LiUNA Local 1001 reached a Tentative Argeement on a new contract for our members working for the City of Chicago. We would like to thank our members for their patience and support in getting this deal done. Below you will find a brief highlight sheet of the changes and or additons to the current CBA.

  • Term: 5 years, from 7/1/17 to 6/30/22
  • Prevailing Rate: for members that receive pay based on Prevailing Rate, (CDOT, Aviation, Revenue, etc.) they will receive a $1 per hour raise from 7/1/2017, including retro, and will continue to receive prevailing rate increases on 7/1 of each year of the agreement.
  • Non-Prevailing Rate: Sanitation Laborers, All Salaried positions, Tree Trimmers, etc., who have been receiving yearly increases on 1/1 of each year will receive the following increases
    • 1/1/18 = 2%
    • 1/1/19 = 2.25%
    • 1/1/20 = 2%
    • 1/1/21 = 2.25%
    • 1/1/22 = 2%
    • Retro pay going back to 1/1/18 based on your pay scale
  • 457b (Deferred Comp): the City will match up to
    • $250 in 2020
    • $250 in 2021
    • $500 in 2022
  • Boot Reimbursement: $100 per year for those required to wear safety shoes
  • Paid Parental Leave:
    • 4 weeks for birth mother for non-surgical delivery
    • 6 weeks for birth mother for C-section delivery
    • 2 weeks for spouse or domestic partner of birth mother
    • 2 weeks for the adoption of a child
  • HealthCare Premium Increases:
    • 7/1/18 = .5%
    • 1/1/19 = .5%
    • 1/1/20 = .5%
  • Prescription Drug Deductible:
    • 2019 = $35 deductible (per household)
    • 2020 = $35 deductible (per household)
    • 2021 = $75 deductible (per household)
    • 2022 = $75 deductible (per household)
  • HealthCare Premium Cap: *Does not include overtime
    • 2019 = 100k  2020 = 115k  2021 = 130k
  • Promotional Bid Lockout: shortened from 12 to 6 months from last promotion
  • Promotion out of Bargaining Unit: return extended to 60 months
  • Comp Time: payout over 160 hours on June 1 of each year
  • Single Vacation Days:
    • Can now use 6 VVS (sick) days per year
    • Can now use 6 VVF (single vacation) days per year
  • Vacation Carryover: Employees with 10 or more years of service can carry over  up to 5 days which must be used by June 30, less than 10 years may still carryover until June 30 also
  • FMCS Pilot for Discipline Hearings: A mediator from the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service will hear disciplinary write-ups and make recommendations to the parties, effectively creating an Independent Hearing Officer
  • 4 -10’s Pilot: Joint venture with Teamsters Local 700 to operate a one year pilot to eliminating the 4 -10 straight time holiday weeks. All hours worked beyond 8 will be paid at appropriate overtime rate. If we can show efficiencies and cost savings the City will discontinue the 4 -10 straight time holiday weeks indefinitely
  • CDOT Specific Issues:
    • Supervising Timekeeper converted to Grade 12
    • District Asphalt Supervisor converted to hourly position
    • Seasonal Asphalt Laborers, Concrete Laborers, Laborers Transportation who have worked or in the future who do work 4,160 consecutive hours in title and in bureau in CDOT will be made Career Service
  • One Man Truck Pay
    • $3.25 per hour years 2018, 2019, 2020 (all employees including General Laborers)
    • $3.50 per hour years 2021, 2022 (all employees including General Laborers)
  • General Laborers
    • All General Laborers will immediately receive pay raises ranging from $2.23 to $2.50 per hour depending on step and category, plus 3% upon reaching the 2,080 hr steps, equaling an increase of 23% over the term of the agreement
    • Probation reduced from 8,320 hours to 5,200 hours
    • Bidding restrictions for vacancies reduced from 8,320 hours to 2,080 hours
    • Elimination of Forestry duties excluding inoculation and cleanup
  • New Title of Tree Trimmer Trainee
    • 70% of Tree Trimmer Rate first 2,080 hours
    • 80% of Tree Trimmer Rate next 2,080 hours
    • 90% of Tree Trimmer Rate next 2,080 hours
    • 100% Career Service thereafter

 

Lawmakers push right-to-work for 2020 ballot

“Right-to-work” legislation, known by opponents as “union-busting” or “anti-worker,” is back in Ohio.

But like prior attempts to limit funding and membership in public- and private-sector unions, this latest round of free market resolutions appears to lack enough votes in the Republican-controlled Statehouse, especially when half of Ohio’s senators and the entire House are up for re-election this year.

Rep. John Becker, a Clermont County Republican, proposed similar reforms in 2016 when his House Bill 53 failed to gain momentum. The legislation would have banned unions from taking dues out of paychecks or representing nonmembers in labor disputes with bosses. Becker’s current proposals, which go further by also outlawing requirements that contractors pay higher wages on publicly funded projects, could put a menu of collective bargaining rights up for a public vote.

Becker and Rep. Craig Riedel, R-Defiance, introduced House Joint Resolutions 7 through 12 before the winter holiday break. Each resolution would chip away at organized labor, a move that conservatives say appeals to CEOs seeking to control payroll costs.

Slim chance

The proposals could each appear on the Nov. 3, 2020, ballot, adding a polarizing dynamic to Ohio’s next presidential election. But that’s a long shot.

First, House leadership would have to move them out of committee for a floor vote. Speaker Cliff Rosenberger’s office is reviewing the six ballot resolutions, saying that “the issue of right-to-work has been brought forward numerous times in recent years, and it always generates an important and interesting discussion amongst the caucus.”

Last year, Becker’s House Bill 53 — with more sponsors than the current plan — died in the finance committee. That powerful committee remains chaired by Rep. Ryan Smith, a Galia County Republican who may challenge Rep. Larry Householder, R-Perry County, to be the next speaker. Some conservative colleagues consider Householder friendlier to labor than Smith, which doesn’t bode well for the right-to-work agenda.

Should the proposed ballot issues make it to the House floor, a supermajority passage of three-fifths is required. The process repeats for the Senate.

Then, Gov. John Kasich would have to sign the resolutions. That’s unlikely as the term-limited Kasich has said taking on unions is “not on my agenda,” especially after signing the union-trimming Senate Bill 5 in 2011 only to watch 62 percent of Ohioans veto his signature eight months later at the polls.

Labor vs. CEOs

The recent ballot proposals would be a win for pro-business conservatives.

They would limit new union enrollees, exacerbating an overall decline in membership since 1983 as steep losses in the private sector have erased moderate gains on the public-sector side. Mayors would be prohibited from requiring prevailing wages for workers on public projects. Tax incentives and contracts could not be awarded based on whether the work is done by union labor. One resolution would require annual elections for union bosses (which is standard in some labor organizations). Another seeks to outlaw the deduction of union dues from paychecks.

There’s little consensus among researchers on whether these polarizing measures drive up, down or have any impact on wages and job growth. Think tanks and economists lean left or right on the issue, often releasing conflicting reports that suggest unions improve working conditions and boost wages but scare off employers.

“Because right-to-work laws lower wages and benefits, weaken workplace protections and decrease the likelihood that employers will be required to negotiate with their employees, they are advanced as a strategy for attracting new businesses to a state,” writes researchers with the Economic Policy Institute, which says it is nonpartisan. “EPI research shows that right-to-work laws do not have any positive impact on job growth.”

A 2015 EPI report, which attempted to adjust for cost of living and other differences that vary from state to state, found that wages under right-to-work laws were 16 percent lower. But proponents note that companies and executives prefer to do business in states where union rights are less protected by state law.

“At the end of the day it’s those CEOs who are making the decisions on where to locate their businesses and whether to hire employees. Their opinions matter,” said Rep. Kristina Roegner, a Hudson Republican and one of nine lawmakers to co-sponsor the right-to-work ballot proposals, though she thinks them “largely symbolic” and not likely to pass. Roegner, a 2018 candidate for state Senate, introduced House Bill 163 in 2017 with Riedel to limit, but not eliminate as the ballot issue would, prevailing wage requirements on public projects. With half of all House Republicans and Speaker Rosenberger on board, Roegner’s bill has a decent chance of passing.

Conservative politicians and institutions, from Becker to the Heritage Foundation, also argue that right-to-work rules do not prohibit unions, only obligatory membership. Opponents lament the negative impact on workers’ rights.

28 and counting

The nonpartisan National Conference of State Legislatures says nine states have right-to-work amendments in their constitutions. Ohio could be No. 10 in 2020.

Ohio’s Senate Bill 5 never became effective in the few months between lawmakers passing and the public repealing it. Today, 28 states have right-to-work laws — more than half (16) from legislation passed between 1943 and 1955 in sharp response to the post-World War II labor strikes of 1945 and 1946.

Since 2012, though, right-to-work has made a sweeping comeback, becoming law in seven states, including neighboring Kentucky and West Virginia. More states have adopted right-to-work in the past five years than the six decades before them. Conservatives in Ohio look optimistically on the recent spate of Republican-controlled statehouses favoring not labor but employers who promise work and jobs to states with the least restrictive hiring requirements.

“I’ve seen states moving toward right-to-work and you wonder why,” said Roegner.

In an annual Chief Executive ranking of the best states to do business, the states that CEOs prefer to Ohio are all right-to-work. So too are some of the states that rank lower than Ohio, which has jumped from 22nd to 11th best since 2004.

Lawmakers like Roegner pay attention when 78 percent of CEOs surveyed this year said they either prefer or require to operate in business climates with right-to-work rules.

“The work we’ve done has helped, all the regulatory work and tax reform has helped. So we have moved up. But I want Ohio to be No. 1,” said Roegner, who doesn’t “benchmark states that are behind us” — 18 of which have right-to-work rules.

In Less Than A Year, Trump Has Stripped Back Workers’ Ability To Unionize

By Dave Jamieson – HuffPost

Candidate Donald Trump pitched himself as the right choice for union workers. He bragged that he’d had good relations with labor unions during his real estate career. He argued that he deserved the AFL-CIO labor federation’s electoral endorsement, which ultimately went to his opponent, Hillary Clinton.

But in less than a year as president, Trump has wiped away several of the modest policy gains that organized labor made during the Obama years. The nominees he’s chosen to fill crucial regulatory roles are already making it more difficult for some workers to join unions and bargain collectively.

These policy reversals have drawn enthusiastic cheers from business lobbies and made a joke of one of Trump’s campaign boasts: “I have great relationships with unions.” Meanwhile, union ranks are hovering near historic lows.

In the last weeks of 2017, the National Labor Relations Board issued a slew of decisions that rolled back worker- and union-friendly reforms from the preceding eight years. The NLRB is the independent federal agency responsible for interpreting collective bargaining law and refereeing disputes between employers, unions and workers.

The new rulings were made possible by Trump’s two nominees to the five-member NLRB ― William Emanuel and Marvin Kaplan ― which flipped the board’s majority from liberal to conservative. The board managed to get several contentious decisions out the door before Dec. 16, when the term of the third Republican member, Philip Miscimarra, expired, deadlocking the board at 2-2.

In one of the most consequential changes, the NLRB reversed a 2011 ruling that helped workers form smaller unions within a single larger workplace. The precedent set during the Obama years allowed, say, nursing home assistants to hold a union election without including all the facility’s dietary aides, maintenance workers and other employees who don’t share similar job duties, wages and gripes with management.

Employers hated that standard, complaining that it led to “micro unions.” By overturning it, the Trump-shaped board made organizing workers at a large facility a far more daunting task. Consider the case they ruled on: After 100 welders unionized at a manufacturing plant, the NLRB found the smaller organizing unit  to be illegitimate and said any union election would have to include all 2,500 different types of workers at the company, spanning 120 job classifications.

The board ruled 3-2 along partisan lines in the case. The two dissenting Democratic members said it was “unconscionable” for the Republican majority to make such a sweeping change without at least soliciting briefs from unions and employers. “It is a dereliction of the duty we owe to the parties and the labor-management community,” they wrote.

The Republican majority took an ax to another major precedent set during the Obama years known as the “joint employer” standard.

Back in 2015, the NLRB ruled that companies can’t dodge their responsibilities to their workers just by outsourcing management duties to subcontractors or franchisees. The ruling made it easier for workers to file labor complaints against big companies like McDonald’s, which claim they aren’t the employers of the masses of people who labor at their franchise restaurants. The ruling also opened the door for fast food workers to potentially unionize in large groups, rather than store by store.

But the new board flipped that decision, reverting the joint employer test to a standard more favorable to fast-food chains and other big companies that contract out work. McDonald’s is likely to benefit almost immediately in a current case over its responsibilities as a potential joint employer.

Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.), the top Democrat on the Senate committee overseeing the NLRB, said in a statement that the change in the joint employer standard would make it harder for workers to bargain for higher wages. “And it goes against everything President Trump promised working people during the campaign,” she added.

In addition to the two board members, Trump has also chosen a new NLRB general counsel, who functions as a kind of prosecutor and brings cases before the board. While President Barack Obama’s nominees aggressively pursued employers for unfair labor practices, Trump’s pick, Peter Robb, has already signaled that he intends to unwind much of what his predecessors did.

In a December memo first reported by HuffPost, Robb told the agency’s regional directors that any expansion of workers’ rights under Obama was effectively on hold for now. He also rescinded several guidance memos that were issued under the previous more-liberal board and that employers argued were too favorable to unions and workers. Robb had represented employers and business groups in labor and employment disputes as a private attorney before Trump plucked him for the general counsel’s position.

For now, the deadlocked NLRB won’t be able to rule on contentious cases, making it unlikely that other Obama-era policies will be undone in the near future. But Trump will have the chance to nominate a fifth member to the board in 2018. The GOP Congress will need only a simple majority to confirm the nominee and give the board a 3-2 Republican majority once again.

Happy Holidays from LiUNA!

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Happy Holidays 2017
Dear Brothers and Sisters,

On behalf of myself, General Secretary-Treasurer Armand E. Sabitoni,  and the entire LIUNA General Executive Board, I want to wish you, and every member of the LIUNA family, the best of Holiday Seasons and a Happy New Year.

As union members, we have much to be thankful for this year. Our great International Union has continued to grow; increasing our strength and organizing new members to better fight for good middle-class jobs with family-supporting pay and benefits.

With the continued dedication and commitment of our leadership and membership, LIUNA has earned and is recognized as one of the most effective, powerful, and respected labor organizations in all of North America.

As we look forward to 2018, I am convinced that our best days are ahead of us and that the LIUNA members, whom we proudly represent, have the strength, will, and determination to meet every challenge and seize every opportunity that comes our way.

I wish you and yours a safe, healthy, and prosperous 2018.

CISCO LAUNCHES 2018 SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

CISCO LAUNCHES 2018 SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM Seven scholarships available; deadline for applications Feb. 23, 2018

The Construction Industry Service Corporation is now accepting applications for its 2018 Scholarship Program. The three different program categories enable a wider range of the children of both building trade union members and union contractor employees to apply.

CISCO offers (3), four-year scholarships ($2,000/year) to high school seniors; (2), two-year awards ($1,000/year) for seniors planning to attend community college; and (2), two-year continuing education awards ($1,000/year) to adult union members or contractor employees.

“A highly-trained, innovative and educated workforce is the key to keeping our industry and other businesses at the top,” says CISCO Executive Director Dan Allen. “Training our future generations needs to be priority one. “Every person who applies is already a winner as each year we read entries from increasingly talented students. This is a testament to our construction industry parents and families who have instilled a strong work ethic and character in their children.”

Applications for each of the three categories of scholarships are available at www.cisco.org/ scholarships/ or by calling CISCO at 630-472-9411. The program was established in 1994 in order to provide educational support for CISCO members and their families.

All applications and accompanying documents must be postmarked by February 23, 2018 to be eligible for consideration. Winners will be noti ed in mid-March and awards will be presented at CISCO’s Annual Luncheon in April, 2018. For judging criteria, application information, and eligibility requirements, please refer to the application forms.

If you would like more information about this topic, please call Gary Kara at at 630/472-9411

The Construction Industry Service Corporation (CISCO) is a 501(c)(6) not-for-pro t association representing 8,000 contractors and 140,000 workers in the Northeastern Illinois union construction industry. Through its legislative, promotional, and workforce development initiatives, CISCO’s mission is to foster the cooperative relationship between labor and management to strengthen the union construction industry as a whole.

Job/Bid Announcement General Laborer

See the Jobs tab of our app to get the full job description, duties and info on bidding.
GENERAL LABORER – DSS 
BID/JOB ANNOUNCEMENT
 
Department:  STREETS & SANITATION
These positions are open to the general public and to all current city employees covered under the terms of the City’s collective bargaining agreement with LABORERS INTERNATIONAL UNION OF NORTH AMERICA LOCAL 1001 (BARGAINING UNIT 54).   
 
IF YOU AREA CURRENT CITY EMPLOYEEAND WANT TO EXERCISE YOUR CONTRACTUAL RIGHTS TO BID, YOU MUST APPLY ON THE BIDONLY SITE AT: www.cityofchicago.org/CAREERS  
(Once the website opens, scroll down and click on the button titled “Bid Opportunities.”)
 
IN ADDITION, YOU MUST CHECK THE BOX ON THE CAREERS APPLICATION TITLED “ALREADY EMPLOYED BY THIS COMPANY”CORRECTLY ENTER YOUR EMPLOYEE ID, AND SELECT THE CORRECT BARGAINING UNIT.  YOU MUST USE THE EMPLOYEE NUMBER FOUND ON THE UPPER LEFT-HAND CORNER OF YOUR PAY CHECK STUB LABELED “PAYEE/EMPLOYEE NUMBER.”
(NO OTHER FORMAT OR SYSTEM CAN BE USED TO GET YOUR EMPLOYEE NUMBER). 
 
FAILURE TO CHECK THE “ALREADY EMPLOYED BY THIS COMPANY” BOX, ENTER YOUR EMPLOYEE ID, AND SELECT THE CORRECT BARGAINING UNIT WILL RESULT IN A REJECTED BID APPLICATION. 
 
 
Number of Positions: 50  (SEASONAL)

Emanuel picks City Hall vet John Tully to run Streets and Sanitation

Fran Spielman/Sun-Times

Streets and Sanitation workers on a garbage truck work in South Shore. | Brian Jackson/Sun-Times file photo

A seasoned City Hall bureaucrat with a background in finance, administration and operations was chosen by Mayor Rahm Emanuel Wednesday to be Chicago’s $157,092-a-year Streets and Sanitation commissioner.

John Tully replaces Charles Williams, a former high-ranking Chicago Police officer who came to the job of running the city’s third-largest department in 2012 with no experience in the nuts-and-bolts of snow removal or garbage collection.

Williams, 65, managed to learn on the job while executing what Emanuel calls the “most significant operational reform” in the department’s history: the switch from a ward-by-ward system for garbage collection to a grid system that saves time, money and crews.

Although aldermen resisted the change, Williams managed to pull off what the mayor’s office claims to be a $30 million efficiency.

The grid system has also allowed the city to claim it has eliminated its backlog for graffiti removal requests, dramatically reduced its backlog of tree trimming requests and now responds to complaints about Chicago’s burgeoning population of rats within five days.

Now, it’ll be Tully’s job to build on those reforms while finding an elusive solution to Chicago’s anemic recycling rate — 10 percent citywide and 4.5 percent on the Southeast Side.

In a press release announcing a changing-of-the-guard that was not unexpected at City Hall, Emanuel charged Tully with building on the previous reforms while “improving cart operations and finding new ways to fight rodents.”

The mayor’s 2018 budget will add five more rodent control crews — for a total of 30 — and provide $500,000 in additional funding to purchase more black garbage carts.

“John has worked side-by-side with Charles over the past several years to transform Streets and Sanitation into a department that provides faster, more efficient services for the residents of Chicago,” Emanuel was quoted as saying in a press release.

“I am confident he will continue pushing to find new ways to enhance the department’s operations.”

Ald. Mike Zalewski (23rd), a former deputy commissioner at Streets and San, said Tully is a terrific choice to confront the issues in a housekeeping department that can make-or-break the local alderman.

“When you have situations, like major snowstorms, experience is everything,” Zalewski wrote Wednesday in a text message to the Chicago Sun-Times.

“John came up through the ranks. He’s well-respected. He will be a good commissioner. He’s steady. Knows operations like the back of his hand. He is also seasoned in dealing with the City Council.”

Tully, whose appointment must be ratified by the City Council, was quoted as saying he looks forward to “continuing to find new and innovative ways to optimize services.”

Tully has a masters degree in public service management and 35 years of experience in administration, operations and finance.

He worked on economic development for two Illinois treasurers before moving up through the ranks at Streets and San — from fiscal administrator to general superintendent, deputy commissioner of the Sanitation Bureau, managing deputy commissioner and first deputy commissioner.

Williams’ retirement is well-timed.

Chicago’s unseasonably warm November has allowed him to escape snow removal season, which can turn into long nights sleeping at Snow Command.

“I enjoyed the challenge. But at the same time, I certainly don’t mind missing it, either, as far as the winter goes,” Williams said Wednesday.

“Winter requires very long hours. And most snowstorms start about 2 in the morning.”

Williams said Tully’s biggest challenge will be finding a solution to Chicago’s chronic recycling problem without fining residents who refuse to recycle.

“I do not think penalizing people is the answer. It’s more of a huge campaign on information and getting the correct methodology out to the residents,” Williams said.

“Chicago has to improve that. It’s a must….I have no doubt that John Tully will be able to turn that [ten percent] number around.”

Williams urged his successor to remain open to new ideas to combat Chicago’s never-ending rat problem and to remain accessible–not just to aldermen, but to their constituents.

“I used to get calls at my desk on a regular basis from folks who had complaints. You have to make sure you’re attentive to those complaints,” the outgoing commissioner said.

Pressed to describe the advice he has given Tully when the snow starts to fall, Williams said, “Coffee. Lots of black coffee.”

BID/JOB ANNOUNCEMENT, FIELD SERVICE SPECIALIST III – CHICAGO DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION

Check out the full details of this Bid/Job opening in the Jobs tab of our app or on our website. 

FIELD SERVICE SPECIALIST III – CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

CHICAGO DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION

 

These positions are open to the general public and to all current city employees covered under the terms of the City’s collective bargaining agreement with the Locals 1001 of the LABORERS INTERNATIONAL UNION OF NORTH AMERICA (BARGAINING UNIT #54).

NUMBER OF VACANCIES: 2

Under supervision, responsible field inspection of professional service and construction procurements of the Chicago Department of Aviation Construction Management group to ensure compliance related to minority owned and women-owned business enterprise (MBE/WBE), Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) and other diversity supplier certification programs; assist in monitoring for compliance with contract requirements and applicable municipal, state and federal laws; and performs related duties as required.

The position assists the activities of the Chicago Department of Aviation Planning and Development Group to support the O’Hare 21 and capital improvement projects. The position inspects the activities of various construction firms that hold design-bid-build, JOC, and term contracts with the Chicago Department of Aviation. The projects vary in scope and complexity (small scale renovation work, airfield runway projects, large scale facility projects, etc.). The position leverages construction industry and aviation industry best practices.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES:

  • Works with senior level staff in conducting site visits of construction projects to monitor contract compliance with MBE/WBE requirements, EEO and CRO guidelines, and other federal, state, and local requirements
  • Works with senior level staff in conducting inspections for compliance requirements of all contracts, including subcontracting utilization in support of both federal and local procurement rules, regulations and ordinances;
  • additional duties listed on bid site

Location: Aviation Administration Building, 10510 W. Zemke Road, Chicago

Division: Airport Planning and Development

Shift: Monday thru Friday

Hours: 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM

NOTE: This is a 24/7 on-call operations, will be subject to over-time based on operational needs.

THIS POSITION IS IN THE CAREER SERVICE.

Qualifications

Three years of work experience inspecting public way construction and demolition projects, or interpreting blue prints for public way construction and demolition projects, or an equivalent combination of education, training, and experience.

Additional information listed on bid site.

A Message from General President Terry O’Sullivan

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November 21, 2017

Dear LIUNA Brothers and Sisters,

On Thanksgiving and each and every day of the year, I couldn’t be more thankful for the strength of this union, the pride each of you have in the work you do, and the efforts you make to build our country.

While many of us are able to take well-deserved time off to be with our loved ones, the brave men and women of the armed forces who are serving our nation in dangerous conditions far from home and still others, who are closer to home, may lack even the most basic of necessities. I hope you will join me in honoring this special holiday by rededicating ourselves to the cause of helping those in need and saluting those who keep us safe.

On behalf of myself, General Secretary-Treasurer Armand E. Sabitoni and the entire LIUNA General Executive Board, I wish each and every one of our half-million strong members and their families a safe, meaningful and enjoyable holiday.

With kind regards, I am

Fraternally yours,

TERRY O NEW SIGNATURE.JPG

TERRY O’SULLIVAN
General President

Here’s what happened to teachers after Wisconsin gutted its unions

by Lydia DePillis   @CNNMoney

Britta Pigorsch was a sophomore in a high school outside of Madison, Wisconsin, when Act 10 passed the state legislature in 2011.

She already knew she wanted to be a teacher. But the legislation, which gutted collective bargaining rights for public sector unions and slashed their benefits, galvanized her further.

“It angered me,” said Pigorsch. “I thought: Well, I could either not go into education, or I could go into education and be a voice that stands up for it.”

Now 22 years old and soon to receive her teaching certificate from the University of Wisconsin, Pigorsch faces a vastly changed landscape.

Along with diminished leverage with school boards, teachers have seen lower pay, reduced pension and health insurance benefits and higher turnover as educators hop from one district to another in search of raises, a new report finds.

With the Supreme Court preparing to hear a case that could make paying dues to unions voluntary for public sector employees — like they already are in right-to-work states — Wisconsin’s experience could soon confront teachers across the country as well.

In the five years since Act 10 was passed, median salaries for teachers in the state have fallen by 2.6% and median benefits declined 18.6%, according to an analysis of state administrative databy the left-leaning Center for American Progress Action Fund.

chart wisconsin teachers

In addition, 10.5% of public school teachers in Wisconsin left the profession after the 2010-2011 school year, up from 6.4% the year before. The exit rate remains elevated, at 8.8%.

As a consequence, the report found, Wisconsin’s educational workforce is less experienced: Teachers had an average of 13.9 years experience under their belt in the 2015-2016 academic year, down from 14.6 years in 2010-2011.

Teachers aren’t just moving out of the state or out of the field entirely. A higher percentage of teachers are also moving to other districts: From 2015 to 2016, the percentage who did so jumped from 1.3% to 3.4%, according to the report.

“In a climate right now where we see the only way an educator could get a pay raise is moving to another district, that’s a natural outcome,” said Christina Brey, a spokeswoman for the Wisconsin Education Association Council, which represents grade school employees.

That’s particularly difficult for rural districts, which can’t afford to pay more to retain good teachers. The report found that teachers in rural areas werethe most likely to move districts, and the average level of experience among teachers in those areas had fallen the most: One out of four rural teachers had taught for fewer than five years in 2015-2016, up from 17.6% in the year before Act 10 passed.

“Rural schools oftentimes are seen as starting grounds, where newer teachers can put in a year or two before moving to a wealthier area where they can get a pay raise,” Brey said.

So how has all this affected kids?

Related: Billionaire pulls the plug on DNAInfo, Gothamist after vote to unionize

The report’s authors, David Madland and Alex Rowell, reviewed other research that suggested that as collective bargaining agreements expired, students performed slightly worse on standardized tests, particularly in already struggling schools.

But perfect measurement is difficult, since the tests have changed several times since Act 10 passed. The conservative, Madison-based John K. MacIver Institute for Public Policy, which supports Act 10, argues that other metrics — such as graduation rates and the number of advanced placement tests taken — are trending upward.

“I think if this cataclysmic destruction scenario was going to play out, you wouldn’t be seeing such positive education news,” says Chris Richardson, the organization’s communications director.

Nobody disputes, however, that Act 10 had a devastating impact on Wisconsin’s unions, which went from representing 14.1% of workers in the state in 2011 to 9% in 2016.

The case currently pending before the Supreme Court, Janus vs. AFSCME, could make paying dues to unions voluntary for public sector employees. (Currently, in non-right-to-work states that allow collective bargaining for public employees, all workers covered by a union contract must pay dues.)

That would cut into the unions’ budgets and reduce their power, which could lead to the same weakening of pay and benefits that Wisconsin’s teachers have experienced.

But unions in other states have seen this coming for a long time. The unions weathered a similar case that deadlocked last year after the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, and they have since taken steps to build confidence among their membership so they will keep paying dues even if it’s no longer required.

Related: Why the world isn’t getting a pay raise

“As a result of the dress rehearsal that they got, they all in their own ways have taken steps to be as prepared as they can be,” says Michael Childers, director of the School for Workers at the University of Wisconsin. “It’s not like they haven’t seen this coming.”

In the years since Act 10 passed, Brey said her union has adapted by becoming more active on the local level, and offering more training and other services to make membership more appealing for teachers.

Meanwhile, Pigorsch is considering where to look for a job after she earns her certificate in January. Many of her peers, she said, have been warned off by older teachers who’ve become cynical about the changes to Wisconsin schools. She wants to stay and try to improve things in Wisconsin, but better pay and stronger representation are just across the St. Croix River in Minnesota.

“A part of me thinks I want to start my career feeling good about being a teacher, and being respected, and having the benefits that a union can give me,” Pigorsch said. “If the students from the state’s top teaching school don’t even want to teach in their own home state, I don’t think that’s a very good sign.”

A Message from General President Terry O’Sullivan

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Dear Brothers and Sisters,

On this Veterans Day and Remembrance Day we are all aware of dangers around the globe and the men and women in uniform across the United States and Canada who shield and protect us from them.

From the Middle East to the Pacific Rim of Asia and lands in between, we salute our service members and veterans. We honor their everyday sacrifices and the dedication that means months and years spent far from home. And we honor all those who have paid the ultimate price. Their courage must never be forgotten.

In the 114 years since our founding, tens of thousands of LIUNA members have answered the call to serve their countries. As our veterans have served us, we must also serve them – through Helmets to Hardhats, by recruiting them into good jobs, and by supporting programs and policies that honor and reward their service.

On behalf of myself, General Secretary-Treasurer Armand E. Sabitoni and the entire LIUNA General Executive Board, we thank each and every veteran not just on this holiday, but every day. Let’s vow never to forget all those who have served our countries and sacrificed their lives to protect us. We are in their debt.

With kind regards, I am

Fraternally yours,

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TERRY O’SULLIVAN
General President

Rauner scores big win by small margin on ‘right-to-work’ veto

This is why we need to elect Union friendly politicians not only in the City of Chicago but also in Springfield and in Washington D.C., your future depends on it. 

By Tina Sfondeles – Chicago Sun-Times

SPRINGFIELD—In a big win for Gov. Bruce Rauner — and perhaps a sign that Republican legislators haven’t deserted him — the Illinois House failed by just one vote to override his veto of a bill that would prohibit local municipalities from enacting “right-to-work” zones to get around unions.

This week of the veto session was seen as a test of how badly the governor had alienated Republicans after signing into law a House bill that expands public funding of abortion — a move that even spawned the possibility he’ll get a primary challenger.

The test comes three months after Rauner saw some House Republicans buck him on a tax and budget package. But on Wednesday, Illinois House Republican Leader Jim Durkin worked his caucus hard — and only four Republicans broke ranks on the override measure, joining 66 Democrats.  The 70-42 vote fell one vote short.

Rauner’s victory lap for an issue he’s pushed since his election may be a short one, however.  A motion to reconsider the vote can still be filed, and bill sponsor state Rep. Marty Moylan, D-Des Plaines, plans to file separate legislation ahead of the veto session next month to remove a controversial portion of the measure that offers a criminal penalty to local governments that enact right-to-work. Both of those options offer an opportunity to get additional votes on the measure.

An override requires 71 votes, and there are 67 House Democrats.

Right-to-work essentially allows people to work in union jobs without paying union dues. Rauner included it in his “Turnaround Agenda.” He’s argued that without it, local municipalities are denied flexibility, resulting in fewer jobs, slower economic growth and higher taxes.

In a statement, the governor called the failed override a “victory” for the people of Illinois.

“Instead, courageous House lawmakers stood together to dump the old playbook and move forward to make Illinois more competitive,” the governor said in a statement.

The Illinois Senate voted 42-13 to override the veto on Tuesday, with no debate.  After the Senate override, the governor’s office said the override “could create a damaging loss for the economic competitiveness of Illinois.” The governor’s office said the vote denies local communities the ability to decide for themselves how they’d like to structure regulations to compete with nearby states.

The statement responding to the Senate vote came out the same day Rauner released a campaign ad featuring the governors of Wisconsin, Indiana and Missouri thanking Illinois House Speaker Mike Madigan for sending jobs their way.

While Rauner has signaled his support for right-to-work for years, he’s also focused on a U.S. Supreme Court case — of which he was the initial plaintiff — that challenges whether government employee unions should be able to collect fees from nonmembers. Rauner’s former chief of staff Kristina Rasmussen, a former head of the Illinois Policy Institute, said she left his administration to head an “initiative” in support of the case.

The measure that failed on Wednesday would have prohibited local units of government from instituting “right-to-work” ordinances. The bill was pushed after the village of Lincolnshire in 2015 enacted a right-to-work ordinance, which unions challenged in court. A federal district court agreed with the unions that local right-to-work ordinances are pre-empted by the National Labor Relations Act, which allows states to pass right-to-work laws but doesn’t allow local units of government to do so.

During nearly an hour of debate, state Rep. Jeanne Ives,  R-Wheaton, said the override would send a bad signal to businesses: “It is the nail in the coffin for Illinois business.”

Moylan said the bill would help to send a message that the state shouldn’t become a right-to-work state.

But Republicans had some sticking points with the measure, including a provision that would enact a penalty for local municipalities who enact right-to-work zones. Moylan said that would be removed in a trailer bill.

“This is not a clean bill,” said Rep. Allen Skillicorn, R-East Dundee. “A yes vote is a yes to locking up village trustees and putting local mayors in jail. Let’s just remember that. … We should demand a clean bill, not this.”

Many Democrats pointed the finger at the governor for pushing the right-to-work issue and blaming him for a union busting ideology.

“The governor over and over and over again keeps beating his fist on this,” state Rep. Jay Hoffman, D-Swansea, said, adding workers in nearby right-to-work states “make less, have a higher injury rate at work and less health care for their families.”

Job Bid Announcement – Field Payroll Auditor – DSS

See our Jobs section of our app or the jobs section of our website to bid for this position.
FIELD PAYROLL AUDITOR 
 
Department:  STREETS & SANITATION
This position is covered under the City’s collective bargaining agreement with the County, Municipal and Foreman Local 1001. (BARGAINING UNIT 54).  Only employees in City job titles in this bargaining unit are eligible to bid on this position. 
 
IF YOU ARE A CURRENT CITY EMPLOYEE AND WANT TO EXERCISE YOUR CONTRACTUAL RIGHTS TO BID, YOU MUST CHECK THE BOX ON THE CAREERS APPLICATION TITLED “ALREADY EMPLOYED BY THIS COMPANY”, CORRECTLY ENTER YOUR EMPLOYEE ID, AND SELECT THE CORRECT BARGAINING UNIT.  YOU MUST USE THE EMPLOYEE NUMBER FOUND ON THE UPPER LEFT-HAND CORNER OF YOUR PAY CHECK STUB LABELED “PAYEE/EMPLOYEE NUMBER.” (NO OTHER FORMAT OR SYSTEM CAN BE USED TO GET YOUR EMPLOYEE NUMBER).
 
FAILURE TO CHECK THE “ALREADY EMPLOYED BY THIS COMPANY” BOX, ENTER YOUR EMPLOYEE ID, AND SELECT THE CORRECT BARGAINING UNIT WILL RESULT IN A REJECTED BID APPLICATION.
 
Number of Positions: 1
ESSENTIAL DUTIES
  • Receives and audits Payroll Registers for various payments to employees in the department.
  • Monitors employee time records daily for accuracy by running reports in CATA.
  • Field Payroll Auditors complete employee verifications, obtain payroll records for court proceedings and settlements, retrieve filed tax documents (W2s), reviews all incoming payroll related documents.
  • Completes as needed all pension paperwork, court ordered garnishments, direct deposit forms and promptly forwards as needed to other City departments or agencies.
  • Sorts payroll checks for distribution to citywide department field locations.
  • Investigates and promptly reports findings of all Employee requested payroll inquires of under or overpayments to supervisors.
  • Must have knowledge of relevant collective bargaining agreements, Personnel Rules, and commonly used CATA pay codes.
  • Must have good communication, writing and time management skills. Required to answer the general payroll phone number and provide assistance to employees or others who have payroll inquiries including those who visit the department.
  • Must be proficient with various software such as CATA, Oracle, MS Excel and MS Word.
NOTE:  The list of essential duties is not intended to be inclusive; there may be other duties that are essential to particular positions within the class.

Go Cubs Go!

Let’s show our Chicago support, our LiUNA Local 1001 support, for our Chicago Cubs. Just like our brothers and sisters of LiUNA there is no nothside or southside when it comes to supporting each other. It’s OUR Cubs, it’s OUR Union.  Go Cubs!

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Why it’s only right that non- union workers pay dues in agency shop

Chicago Sun-Times – BY MARICK F. MASTERS 

Marick F. Masters is director of Labor@ Wayne at Wayne State University, which includes the Douglas A. Fraser Center for Workplace Issues. He is also a professor of business and adjunct professor of political science.

The U. S. Supreme Court will soon hear a case challenging the agency shop in the public sector.

The Supreme Court will soon hear a case challenging the requirement that non- union workers pay union dues in an agency shop.Opponents of the agency shop, which requires nonunion employees to pay union dues, argue that it infringes on an individual’s freedom to work, violates one’s freedom of speech, confers upon unions a privilege ( payment of dues) unavailable to other associations and grants undue power to labor organizations.

Each argument is specious.

First, the agency shop makes no more infringement on freedom to work than any other condition of employment required by an employer, such as confidentiality, non- compete and mandatory employment arbitration agreements. A major difference between the agency shop and these other conditions is that the former is bilaterally negotiated while the latter are decreed by management.

Second, the agency shop in no way abridges an employee’s right to object to a union’s positions on issues taken at the bargaining table or in politics. Any employee in a bargaining unit may protest any position taken. In addition, non- union employees may block the use of their dues for political activities.

Third, unions are granted the right to negotiate the agency shop under existing labor laws because they have a legal obligation to represent all the employees in the bargaining unit, even those who choose not to join the union. Non- union employees represented by labor organizations reap the gains of higher wages and better benefits negotiated into contracts. They also are entitled to union representation in the grievance process.

Simply put, unions, which are duly recognized bargaining representatives, enjoy the “privilege” of negotiating agency shops because of their legal obligation to represent all, regardless of membership status.

Finally, the monetary “windfall” ascribed to the agency shop, which presumably might consign to labor unwarranted power, needs to be put into perspective. Labor’s financial wherewithal pales in comparison to business.

The total income from dues and other employeebased fees generated by all national labor organizations in the United States amounted to $ 4.05 billion in 2016. This sum is merely a fraction of the net sales of any one of the largest firms in the U. S., such as Amazon, which totaled $ 136 billion in 2016.

Indeed, the financially disadvantaged place of labor in politics is revealed in the 15- to- 1 advantage businesses had in expenditures made in the 2016 federal elections: $ 3.4 billion compared with labor’s $ 205 million.

The animosity towards labor unions is palpable. Opponents of the agency shop seek not to spread freedom or democracy in the workplace but rather to emasculate unions. The agency shop is attacked because it promotes the institutional security of unions.

Viable unions are essential to giving voice to otherwise mute workers in the workplace and in politics. There is no other cohesive countervailing power to corporate dominance. Exclusive representation combined with the agency shop promotes equity in the workplace, prevents splintering of the workforce and advances responsible union representation.

Special discount on the CHICAGO SUN-TIMES for CFL-affiliated union members

To help encourage union members to sign up for a subscription, the Chicago Sun-Times is offering special pricing for affiliated-unions and their members to subscribe. Please promote this offer widely to your union brothers and sisters so that they will subscribe to the newspaper that reflects the values and character of the working men and women of Chicago. We also hope that you will pick up a subscription for yourself as well. The links to the home delivery and e-paper subscriptions are below.

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CLICK HERE FOR
 7-day HOME DELIVERY · $16.99/month

*includes e-paper subscription

CLICK HERE FOR 7-day E-PAPER SUBSCRIPTION · $2.95/month

 

LiUNA for JB & Juliana

Check out the new video in the video tab of our app to see the great turnout at the Chicagoland Laborers’ District Council event for JB and Juliana.

Thanks to all the members and their families for coming out to show their support for the next Governor and Lt. Governor of Illinois.

 

Job/Bid Announcement – Forestry Supervisor

Please see the Jobs section in our app or on our website for more information and the direct link to the City of Chicago website to apply.

Job Number: 288118 – JOB TITLE:  FORESTRY SUPERVISOR

BID ANNOUNCEMENT

Department:  STREETS & SANITATION

This position is covered under the City’s collective bargaining agreement with the County, Municipal and Foreman Local 1001. (BARGAINING UNIT 54).  Only employees in City job titles in this bargaining unit are eligible to bid on this position. 

 IF YOU ARE A CURRENT CITY EMPLOYEE AND WANT TO EXERCISE YOUR CONTRACTUAL RIGHTS TO BID, YOU MUST CHECK THE BOX ON THE CAREERS APPLICATION TITLED “ALREADY EMPLOYED BY THIS COMPANY”, CORRECTLY ENTER YOUR EMPLOYEE ID, AND SELECT THE CORRECT BARGAINING UNIT.  YOU MUST USE THE EMPLOYEE NUMBER FOUND ON THE UPPER LEFT-HAND CORNER OF YOUR PAY CHECK STUB LABELED “PAYEE/EMPLOYEE NUMBER.” (NO OTHER FORMAT OR SYSTEM CAN BE USED TO GET YOUR EMPLOYEE NUMBER).

FAILURE TO CHECK THE “ALREADY EMPLOYED BY THIS COMPANY” BOX, ENTER YOUR EMPLOYEE ID, AND SELECT THE CORRECT BARGAINING UNIT WILL RESULT IN A REJECTED BID APPLICATION.

Number of Positions: 1

Under general supervision, supervises forestry crews engaged in the planting, maintenance, and removal of trees and plant materials for landscape beautification projects

 ESSENTIAL DUTIES

·        Plans, assigns, and supervises the work activities of forestry crews engaged in the planting, trimming, removal, insect and disease management, and storm damage response of trees and shrubbery on City parkways

·         Develops and implements work plans and prepares time lines for the completion of projects

·         Conducts on-site inspections to ensure the quality and timeliness of work and to ensure that staff follow proper safety procedures

·         Supervises staff in the disposal of landscaping debris

·         Enforces provisions in the City of Chicago Municipal Code, Chapter 10-32 Trees, Plants and Shrubs, as directed by the Deputy Commissioner of Forestry

·         Supervises the completion of surveys to inspect and assess trees and other plant materials to determine the quality, rate of growth, and insect and disease damage

·         Inspects equipment for proper condition and operation and authorizes repairs or replacement as necessary

 

Wisconsin appeals court upholds ‘right-to-work’ law, dealing blow to unions

Patrick Marley, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

MADISON – The state Court of Appeals upheld Wisconsin’s “right-to-work” law Tuesday, dealing a second legal blow to unions two months after a similar federal lawsuit was thrown out.

GOP Gov. Scott Walker and Republican lawmakers in 2015 approved the law, which prohibits labor contracts that require all workers in certain job classifications — including those who don’t want to belong to a union — to pay union fees.

Unions sued in state and federal court. Federal law requires unions to represent all workers in certain job classes, and the unions argued it was unconstitutional for the government to prevent them from collecting fees from all workers who they had to provide services for.

RELATED: For unions in Wisconsin, a fast and hard fall since Act 10

The U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals found the law was constitutional in July and threw out the federal lawsuit.

On Tuesday, the Wisconsin District 3 Court of Appeals unanimously issued a similar decision. The Wausau-based court found the law was constitutional, rejecting the unions’ argument that the government had deprived them of income from non-members.

“The unions have no constitutional entitlement to the fees of non-member employees,” Judge Mark Seidl wrote for the court.

He was joined by Judges Thomas Hruz and Lisa Stark.

Their decision overturned an April 2016 ruling by Dane County Circuit Judge William Foust that found the law unconstitutional. The appeals court had kept the law in place while it considered the case.

The case was brought by the Wisconsin AFL-CIO and units of the International Associations of Machinists and United Steelworkers.

LIUNA GP Video on Infrastructure Investment

It’s time to stop sugar-coating the issue of America’s crumbling roads and bridges, water systems and energy infrastructure.  Both parties have major investment proposals.

Now is the time to act on investment that creates good jobs and builds our nation.

The video is available in the video tab of our app or by using the link below. Please take a minute to view it and hear how important President O’Sullivan’s message is about something that directly effects each and every one of us today.

Watch and share the General President’s video message on infrastructure investment here. 

Job/Bid Announcement – Safety Specialist Chicago Department of Aviation

Job/Bid Announcement     Job Number:289133

SAFETY SPECIALIST – CHICAGO DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION

 

IF YOU ARE A CURRENT CITY EMPLOYEE AND WANT TO EXERCISE YOUR CONTRACTUAL RIGHTS TO BID, YOU MUST APPLY ON THE BID ONLY SITE AT: www.cityofchicago.org/CAREERS 

(Once the website opens, scroll down and click on the button titled “Bid Opportunities.”)

IN ADDITION, YOU MUST CHECK THE BOX ON THE CAREERS APPLICATION TITLED “ALREADY EMPLOYED BY THIS COMPANY”, CORRECTLY ENTER YOUR EMPLOYEE ID, AND SELECT THE CORRECT BARGAINING UNIT.  YOU MUST USE THE EMPLOYEE NUMBER FOUND ON THE UPPER LEFT-HANDCORNER OF YOUR PAY CHECK STUB LABELED “PAYEE/EMPLOYEE NUMBER.”

(NO OTHER FORMAT OR SYSTEM CAN BE USED TO OBTAIN YOUR EMPLOYEE NUMBER).

FAILURE TO CHECK THE “ALREADY EMPLOYED BY THIS COMPANY” BOX, ENTER YOUR EMPLOYEE ID, AND SELECT THE CORRECT BARGAINING UNIT WILL RESULT IN A REJECTED BID APPLICATION.

These positions are open to the general public and to all current city employees covered under the terms of the City’s collective bargaining agreement with the Local 1001 of the LABORERS INTERNATIONAL UNION OF NORTH AMERICA (BU #54).

NUMBER OF VACANCIES: 3

Under supervision, inspects safety and accident prevention practices activities in the work place of the Chicago Department of Aviation Construction Management group, and performs related duties as required. The position will inspects safety and accident prevention practices activities for construction activities of O’Hare 21 and capital improvement projects at O’Hare international and Midway International Airports.

The position assists the activities of the Chicago Department of Aviation Planning and Development Group to support the O’Hare 21 and capital improvement projects. The position inspects the activities of various construction firms that hold design-bid-build, JOC, and term contracts with the Chicago Department of Aviation. The projects vary in scope and complexity (small scale renovation work, airfield runway projects, large scale facility projects, etc.). The position leverages construction industry and aviation industry best practices.

 

ESSENTIAL DUTIES:

  • Assists in developing and implementing departmental safety regulations, policies and procedures
  • Inspects work areas and/or construction sites to ensure working conditions are in compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards and municipal and state safety regulations and policies
  • Makes recommendations to correct observed and reported safety violations and to implement safe work practices including the use of protective gear (e.g., helmets, steel tipped shoes, safety glasses, gloves)
  • Ensures that safety precautions (e.g., sufficient lighting, warning signs, barricades) are posted near construction or hazardous sites
  • Ensures proper procedures are followed and rescue equipment is accessible to crews working in confined spaces and during excavations
  • Investigates accidents to determine their cause and to develop methods and procedures to prevent future occurrences
  • Evaluates automotive and personal injury accident reports for evidence of cause and prepares reports on findings
  • Conducts employee training sessions on safety policies and practices and arranges for product manufacturers to train employees on the proper use of safety equipment and gear
  • Maintains complete and accurate records of personal injury and property accidents
  • Reviews safety policies and practices and assists in updating departmental manuals and policies
  • Drives to field sites to observe practices
  • Other duties as assigned by management
CHICAGO DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION

Location: Aviation Administration Building, 10510 W. Zemke Road, Chicago

Division: Airport Planning and Development

Shift: Monday thru Friday

Hours: 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM

NOTE: This is a 24/7 on-call operations, will be subject to over-time based on operational needs.

THIS POSITION IS IN THE CAREER SERVICE.

 
Qualifications

 An Associate’s degree or higher from an accredited college or university, plus one year of work experience in accident prevention and safety inspection OR at least two years of work experience in accident prevention and safety inspection.

Licensure, Certification, or Other Qualifications:

  • OSHA and Construction related
  • A valid State of Illinois driver’s license is required. Requires obtaining an Airfield Basic Driving Certification (stripe) within six months of hire
  • Asset management experience is preferred but not required
  • Previous aviation industry or FAA experience is preferred but not required
  • Commissioning experience is preferred but not required
  • Building Automation Systems experience is preferred but not required
Education & Employment Verification: Please be advised that if you are selected to be hired you must provide, upon request, adequate information regarding your educational and employment history as it relates to the qualifications of the position for which you are applying.  If you received your degree internationally, all international transcripts/diploma must be accompanied by a Foreign Credential Evaluation.  If the City of Chicago cannot verify this information, any offer extended to you will be withdrawn and you will not be hired.

NOTE:  To be considered for this position you must provide information about your educational background and your work experience. You must include job titles, dates of employment, and specific job duties.  (If you are a current City employee, Acting Up cannot be considered.)  If you fail to provide this information at the time you submit your application, it will be incomplete and you will not be considered for this position.  There are three ways to provide the information: 1) you may attach a resume; 2) you may paste a resume; or 3) you can complete the online resume field.

NOTE:  You must provide your transcripts or diploma, professional license, or training certificates at time of processing, if applicable.  You must also provide your valid U.S. driver’s license at time of processing of processing.

SELECTION REQUIREMENTS:

This position requires applicants to complete an interview. The interviewed candidate(s) possessing the qualifications best suited to fulfill the responsibilities of the position will be selected.

NOTE: The candidate(s) selected for hire must pass an airport background check and a Security Threat Assessment (STA).

VETERANS PREFERENCE NOTE:  The City of Chicago offers Veterans Preference to both current, active military personnel AND military personnel who have served in the Armed Forces of the United States and have received an honorable or general discharge.  Eligible candidates must have at least six months of active duty documented.  In order to receive the veterans preference, candidates need to indicate whether or not they are a veteran by answering “yes” or “no” to the question on the online application that asks, “Are you currently serving on active duty for at least six months in the Armed Forces of the United States OR have you served in the Armed Forces of the United States on active duty for at least six months and received an honorable or general discharge?”  In addition, you must attach documentation to verify your military service.  For veterans, you must attach a copy of your DD214 to your online application which includes character of service status OR a letter from the United States Veterans Administration on official stationary stating dates of service and character of service.  For active military personnel, you must attach a letter from your Commanding Officer on official stationary verifying your active duty, length of service, and character of service in the Armed Forces of the United States AND a copy of your military ID to your online application.  Failure to answer the question and attach the required documentation will result in you not being considered for the Veterans Preference.

Evaluation:  Your initial evaluation will be based on information provided on the application form and documents submitted with the application. Applications must be submitted by the individual applicant.  No second party applications will be accepted.

Residency Requirement: All employees of the City of Chicago must be actual residents of the City as outlined in 2-152-050 of the City of Chicago Municipal Code. Proof of residency will be required.

If you would like to request a reasonable accommodation due to disability or pregnancy in order to participate in the application processplease contact the City of Chicago, Department of Human Resources, at 312-744-4976 (voice) or 312-744-5035. (TTY).  Please be prepared to provide information in support of your reasonable accommodation request.

 

ALL REFERENCES TO POLITICAL SPONSORSHIP OR RECOMMENDATION MUST BE OMITTED FROM ANY AND ALL APPLICATION MATERIALS SUBMITTED FOR CITY EMPLOYMENT.

 

The City of Chicago is an Equal Employment Opportunity and Military Friendly Employer.

 

Unposting Date: Sep 28, 2017, 11:59:00 PM

BU: 54
Salary: $54,972.00 |   Pay Basis:Yearly

 

Apply online here… 

A Message From General President Terry O’Sulllivan

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September 11, 2017

Dear Brothers and Sisters:

As we near the 16th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks, we should take time to reflect and mourn those we lost in the malicious and cowardly attacks. The attack on our nation and the innocent lives cut short will never be forgotten.

We should also honor and commend the heroes, including LIUNA members, who participated in the 9/11 response and clean-up efforts and later the rebuilding of the World Trade Center and construction of the Flight 93 Memorial.

On behalf of myself, General Secretary-Treasurer Armand E. Sabitoni, and the entire LIUNA General Executive Board, I urge that we continue to honor the memory of those lost on 9/11 and share our deep gratitude with those who responded with such fearlessness and dedication to the devastating attacks.
With kind regards, I am

Fraternally yours,

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TERRY O’SULLIVAN
General President