Right-to-Work 101

Why These Laws Hurt Our Economy, Our Society, and Our Democracy

What are right-to-work laws?

In states where the law exists, “right-to-work” makes it illegal for workers and employers to negotiate a contract requiring everyone who benefits from a union contract to pay their fair share of the costs of administering it. Right-to-work has nothing to do with people being forced to be union members.

Federal law already guarantees that no one can be forced to be a member of a union, or to pay any amount of dues or fees to a political or social cause they don’t support. What right-to-work laws do is allow some workers to receive a free ride, getting the advantages of a union contract—such as higher wages and benefits and protection against arbitrary discipline—without paying any fee associated with negotiating on these matters.

That’s because the union must represent all workers with the same due diligence regardless of whether they join the union or pay it dues or other fees and a union contract must cover all workers, again regardless of their membership in or financial support for the union. In states without right-to-work laws, workers covered by a union contract can refuse union membership and pay a fee covering only the costs of workplace bargaining rather than the full cost of dues.

There is scant evidence these laws create jobs, help workers, or are good for a state’s economy, as supporters claim. Instead, these laws weaken unions and thereby hurt workers, the middle class, and local economies. We present here a Right-to-Work 101 so that the debate over right-to-work laws proceeds based on the facts.

Right-to-work laws don’t create jobs

Researchers who study the impact of right-to-work laws find that these laws do not create jobs—despite supporters’ claims to the contrary. The Indiana Chamber of Commerce, for example, claims that “unionization increases labor costs,” and therefore makes a given location less attractive to capital. The purpose, then, of right-to-work laws is to undermine unions and therefore lower wages in a given state, thus attracting more companies into the state.

But in practice this low-road strategy for job creation just doesn’t pan out. Despite boosters’ promises of job creation, researchers find that right-to-work had “no significant positive impact whatsoever on employment” in Oklahoma, the only state to have adopted a right-to-work law over the past 25 years⎯until Indiana did so days ago⎯and consequently the best example of how a new adopter of right-to-work laws might fare in today’s economy. In fact, both the number of companies relocating to Oklahoma and the total number of manufacturing jobs in the state fell by about a third since it adopted such a law in 2001.

Indeed, most right-to-work advocates’ purported evidence of job growth is based on outdated research and misleading assertions. An Indiana Chamber of Commerce-commissioned study found right-to-work states had higher employment growth between 1977 and 2008 compared to states without a right-to-work law, but much of that growth could be attributed to other factors. Those factors included the states’ infrastructure quality, and even its weather—which the study ignored.

Recent research from the Economic Policy Institute that controlled for these factors finds that right-to-work laws have not increased employment growth in the 22 states that have adopted them.

Right-to-work laws hurt workers

Right-to-work laws lower worker pay and benefits and make workplaces more dangerous for all workers—whether unionized or not—by weakening unions.

Unions have a significant and positive effect on the wages and benefits of union and nonunion workers alike. Unionized workers are able to bargain for better wages, benefits, and work conditions than they would otherwise receive if negotiating individually. The effect on the average worker—unionized or not—of working in a right-to-work state is to earn approximately $1,500 less per year than a similar worker in a state without such a law.

Workers in right-to-work states are also significantly less likely to receive employer-provided health insurance or pensions. If benefits coverage in non-right-to-work states were lowered to the levels of states with these laws, 2 million fewer workers would receive health insurance and 3.8 million fewer workers would receive pensions nationwide.

The fact that unionization raises people’s wages and benefits is borne out by surveys of union members and by common sense. Unions also affect the wages and benefits of nonunion workers by setting standards that gradually become norms throughout industries. To compete for workers, nonunion employers in highly unionized industries have to pay their workers higher wages. And unions support government policies (such as minimum-wage laws) that raise workers’ pay.

Right-to-work laws also may hurt workplace safety. For instance, the occupational-fatality rate in the construction industry—one of the most hazardous in terms of workplace deaths—is 34 percent higher in right-to-work states than in states without such laws. And one academic study finds that increasing union density has a positive effect on workplace safety in states with no right-to-work laws (for every 1 percent increase in unionization rates there is a 0.35 percent decline in construction fatality rates), but in right-to-work states, the effect of union density on safety disappears.

Unions are democratic organizations: If employees didn’t like their contracts, they would vote to reject the contract, vote to change their union officers, or vote to get rid of their union—all of which can be done under current law.

Right-to-work laws weaken the middle class

By weakening unions right-to-work laws also weaken the middle class. From pushing for fair wages and good benefits, to encouraging citizens to vote, to supporting Social Security and advocating for family-leave benefits, unions make the middle class strong by giving workers a voice in both the market and our democracy.

Nine of the 10 states with the lowest percentage of workers in unions—Mississippi, Arkansas, South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia, Virginia, Tennessee, Texas, and Oklahoma—are right-to-work states. All of them also are saddled with a relatively weak middle class. The share of total income going to the middle class—defined as the middle 60 percent of the population—in each of these states is below the national average.

If unionization rates increased by 10 percentage points nationwide, the typical middle-class household—unionized or not—would earn $1,479 more each year. In fact, dollar for dollar, strengthening unions is nearly as important to the middle class as boosting college-graduation rates.

Right-to-work laws hurt small business

Since few small businesses are ever unionized, changing union regulations won’t affect them. Yet unlike big manufacturers who can choose which state to expand into, most small businesses are rooted in a local community and dependent on local consumers. When right-to-work laws lower the wages and benefits of area workers, they also threaten to reduce the number of jobs in the economy by reducing consumer demand.

The Economic Policy Institute estimates that for every $1 million in wage cuts, six jobs are lost in the service, retail, construction, real estate, and other local industries. For big manufacturers that sell their products all over the globe, this may be less important.

For small businesses that depend on local sales, reducing the amount of disposable income in local employees’ pockets can be devastating.

Right-to-work laws create rules that would hurt all organizations but only apply to unions

The corporate lobbyists who push for right-to-work legislation—such as the Chamber of Commerce and the National Right to Work Committee—want unions to operate under a set of rules that none of them accept for themselves. These lobbyists would never think of serving the interests of companies that refuse to pay dues to their organizations, yet they want unions to do so in order to drain their resources.

Federal law already guarantees every worker who is represented by a union equal and nondiscriminatory representation—meaning unions must provide the same services, vigorous advocacy, and contractual rights and benefits. This guarantee applies regardless of whether the employee is a union member. So if a non-dues-paying employee encounters a problem at work, the union is required to provide that individual full representation at no charge.

By contrast, the Chamber of Commerce and other employer organizations restrict some of their most valuable services to dues-paying members. When asked if they would agree to provide all services to any interested business, even if that business does not pay dues, Chamber representatives explained that they could not do that because dues are the primary source of Chamber funding and it would be unfair to other dues-paying members. And that certainly makes sense—for unions as well as the Chamber.

The Chamber of Commerce and National Right to Work Committee want unions to be the only organizations in the country that are required to provide full services to individuals who pay nothing for them. This is no different than enabling some American citizens to opt out of paying taxes while making available all government services. This is not an agenda to increase employee rights but rather to undermine the viability of independent-employee organizations.

Right-to-work laws are bad for our political democracy

Right-to-work laws infringe on the democratic rights of the electorate by weakening unions. Unions help boost political participation among ordinary citizens and convert this participation into an effective voice for pro-middle-class policies. By weakening unions, they are less able to advocate for pro-worker policies within our government and help get workers out to vote.

Research shows that for every percentage-point increase in union density, voter turnout increased by 0.2 to 0.25 percentage points. This means that if unionization rates were 10 percentage points higher during the 2008 presidential election, 2.6 million to 3.2 million more citizens would have voted.

Unions also help translate workers’ interests to elected officials and ensure that government serves the economic needs of the middle class. They do this by encouraging the public to support certain policies as well as by directly advocating for specific reforms. Unions were critical in securing government policies that support the middle class such as Social Security, the Affordable Care Act, family leave, and minimum-wage laws.

Indeed, this may be a large part of why many conservatives support right-to-work laws. Research demonstrates that supporters’ claims that these laws will create jobs and strengthen local economies are not credible. Instead, supporters may back these laws as a pretext for attacking an already weakened union movement in hopes of crippling it as a political force and as an advocate for all workers.

The bottom line: Right-to-work laws work against the critical needs of our economy, our society, and our democracy.

David Madland is Director of the American Worker Project at the Center for American Progress Action Fund. Karla Walter is a Senior Policy Analyst with the project. Ross Eisenbrey is vice president of the Economic Policy Institute.

Pence leads under-the-radar attack on unions

Pence leans over an executive order in the Oval Office. The assault on workers in the Executive Branch is led by Pence. | AP

Since he took office, Vice President Pence has been working with high-level Trump backers to develop a comprehensive strategy to weaken labor unions. The strategy he is developing revolves around so-called “right to work” laws that have already been rammed through numerous state legislative bodies. Among the GOP bright lights attending the closed-door sessions with Pence have been Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich.

Pence’s role as architect of a new federal assault on unions is one of the topics tackled recently in an excellent article in the March/April issue of Voice of the ILWU, published by the union’s local 142 in Hawaii. The article, entitled “Trump backs attack on union,” delves into the history of “right to work” and how it has been used to bash workers and their unions.

After a January 28 meeting with Pence and Gingrich, it is noted, Walker bragged that he showed how “bits and pieces” of what he did in Wisconsin to “reform” union law and civil service, can be “applied at the national level.”

The advice Walker gave to the Trump administration is to begin the attack on labor by first going after public workers and their unions. Pence and Trump are likely to oblige that advice since they had already promised to do just that during their campaign.

“So-called right to work laws are designed and funded by big business to weaken unions,” the Voice article says. “They force unions into an impossible situation by making them legally responsible for representing all workers in a shop, while stripping the union’s ability to collect enough fees to cover those representation costs. Strong union shops where everyone is a paying member would be outlawed under the proposed law and replaced with ‘open shops’ where division, disunity and financial hardship weaken the union and leave workers with lower pay, meager benefits and little say over working conditions.”

Perhaps the most powerful feature of the piece is a hard-hitting section on the “ugly origins of right to work.”

The first “right to work” laws, it is noted, were instituted in 1936 by a Texas organization, “the Christian American Association.” The Voice describes the group as a racist outfit run by Southern oilmen and Northern industrialists. Today, their work is continued by organizations like ALEC.

“A top associate of the group once explained her hostility toward workers by criticizing what President Roosevelt’s wife, Eleanor, had done to help workers, especially African Americans: “…Roosevelt stands for a $15 a week salary for all n****** house help, Sundays off, no washing, and no cleaning upstairs,” adding, “My  n***** maid wouldn’t dare sit down in the same room with me unless she sat on the floor at my feet!”

The first right to work laws, the article points out, were passed in 1944. The first two states to approve them were Arkansas and Florida and by 1947 they were law in some 14 southern states. That was the same year that the GOP-controlled Congress passed the infamous Taft-Hartley law which removed from unions and workers numerous rights they had gained under the Wagner Act, passed during the tenure of President Roosevelt. “The anti union laws were popular in the South,” the ILWU article says, “where segregationists warned that union shops and civil rights would lead to ‘race mixing and communism.’”

The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. waged a campaign against right to work laws in the 1960’s. He is quoted: “We must guard against being fooled by false slogans, such as ‘right to work.’ It is a law to rob us of our civil rights and our job rights. Its purpose is to destroy labor unions and the freedom of collective bargaining by which unions have improved wages and working conditions of everyone. Wherever these laws have been passed, wages are lower, job opportunities are fewer and there are no civil rights.”

Another interesting part of the article is how it treats the conservative and right wing reaction to the civil rights gains of the 1960’s including the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, drawing the connection between the attacks on civil rights and the attacks on labor rights:

“Richard Nixon won in 1968 with a ‘Southern Strategy’ that used racist code language, including talk about ‘welfare, less government, violent criminals and states right,’ to win white votes in the South – plus blue collar votes from whites in the Midwest and Northern industrial cities. Nixon’s Chief of Staff, H.R. Haldemann, explained: ‘You have to face the fact that the whole problem is really Blacks. The key is to develop a system that recognized this while not appearing to.’ Ronald Reagan’s campaign strategist, Lee Atwater, explained how racist appeals had won white votes:

“You start out in 1954 by saying, “n*****, n*****, n*****,” By 1968 you can’t say “n*****”- that hurts you. Backfires. So you say stuff like forced busing, states’ rights and all that stuff…”

“This is how,” the ILWU article concludes on this point, the term “right to work” became one of the many racist code words that white politicians used to communicate bigotry and win elections; beginning in the South, and now throughout much of the country.”

We all know all too well that, unlike Las Vegas, what happens in the South does not stay in the South. As of today 28 states, a majority of the states in the country, have “right to work” laws on the books. And we have Vice President Pence working hard on a strategy to make “right to work” national law.

The ILWU’s president, Robert McEllrath, remains undaunted, however. Interviewed for the article in the Voice, he said, “Workers and unions have never gotten anything handed to them on a silver platter, because progress only gets made by pushing the powerful to do what’s right. That’s the way it has always been. And that’s what we need to be doing now and in the future.”

Illinois’ middle class shrank over the last 40 years. Here’s why.

Alexia Elejalde-Ruiz  Chicago Tribune

The decline of the middle class and rise of income inequality have been at the heart of the nation’s economic storyline for years, and a new report attempts to quantify how those trends have hit Illinois.

Middle-income households, which in the early 1970s made up 59 percent of all households in Illinois, constituted just 49 percent of the state’s total during the past five years, according to the report from the Project for Middle Class Renewal at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Meantime, Illinois’ median household income among the middle class has grown very modestly over that period, to $80,800 in 2015 from $79,300 in 1980, adjusting for inflation. But high-income households have seen their median income jump 14.5 percent, to $192,900 from $168,500. The median pay for low-income households has barely budged, to $26,100 from $25,800.

Illinois faced a slightly steeper decline in its middle class than the national average because it had a greater share of middle-income households to begin with. Nationally, middle-income households shrunk from 56 percent to 48 percent over the past 40 years.

Measuring the middle class is challenging, the report said, in part because it isn’t clear how to define it given associations with education and occupation type. The report’s analysis measured middle class by income level, adjusted for household size. So households earning more than two-thirds of the state’s median income and less than double the state’s median income — between $43,000 and $130,000 — are considered middle class.

The shrinking of the middle class has come as the middle-income jobs that used to form its bedrock have eroded. In 1980, nearly 20 percent of middle-income heads of household were working in office and administrative support, and that declined to 15 percent by 2015. The sharpest decline has been in production, which includes manufacturing.

Health care has absorbed many middle-class breadwinners. In 2015, nearly 6 percent of middle-income heads of households were working in health care, compared with 3.4 percent in 1980. Education and business and financial operations also saw notable increases.

But the most occupational growth has been in service jobs with a range of salaries, including financial services at the higher end and food service at the lower end, leaving fewer options in the middle.

The report, authored by Robert Habans, a postdoctoral research associate, did not offer policy recommendations but did suggest how policymakers should think about policy with the objective of shoring up the middle class.

That includes policy that improves the quality of jobs, such as higher minimum wage or unionization, as well as policy that affects labor supply and demand, such as infrastructure investments to create jobs or education investments to improve the talent pool.

“In short, shoring up the middle means making bad jobs better, keeping good jobs good, and supporting the growth of the economy as a whole,” Habans wrote.

 

Union Victory is a Victory for All Special Report

Political Star

BEYOND THE FRONT PAGE HEADLINES ON POLITICS AND NEWS

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By Mac-Z-Zurawski

On June 1st, 2013 I posted my first blog piece after returning from voting in my LiUNA Local 1001 election.  Four years later, a few union education certifications and many late nights of reading, I realized why my vote counts.  It counts because I count.  On May 20th, 2017 the LiUNA Local 1001 Integrity slate composed of a majority of the same leaders of the past several years won sweepingly and mostly by a landslide. They won because they did listen to members needs including, but not limited to: membership expansion, transparency and inclusion.

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The More the Merrier

In the past four years these leaders have increased union membership by nearly 500 people.  Yes, many of those members are now on the second tier but what union isn’t using tiers?  Very few.  As Chicago’s pension crisis rages on, the new general laborers are creating additional funding to our pension while helping our union increase working members.  A majority of new members are twenty somethings and minority.  Integrity slate is inadvertently curing the violence of this city by hiring the targets of our epidemic.  While organizations throughout the city scramble to find people in violence prone areas jobs, Integrity slate did it.  Infusing the general laborers into various bureaus creates an overall lower budget per department.  The lower budget enables 1001 to bargain for expanded jobs in other fields such as FSS, Dispatcher, Arborist, and RCCs for members to receive an expanded career. When I researched and collaborated on the Enterprise Fund, what is commonly termed the Garbage Fee, the major complaint from the City was the expense of prevailing wage labor.   The lower tiered pay scale balances our labor costs.  General laborers can bid into other Local 1001 positions such as Sanitation Clerk, Asphalt Laborer, Laborer Transportation and others. For the career service employees, go to the training opportunities that 1001 posts. Kronos training helps on any management position or iron barricade training which qualifies you for additional overtime opportunities. If your job matters to you and expansion and security is what you really want and need, then support how all that is being done. It’s for you and because of you.

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Taking Off the Cover

Integrity slate has increased transparency of transfers adhered to by seniority than ever before.  The old pull the names out of a hat is not only outdated but illegal.  Integrity understood this and has won that battle with a major city’s HR department.  Before people complain they should know of the countless grievances for years that 1001 submitted against the City for the illegal transfers.  Unions, just like any advocacy organization, must file complaints on behalf of workers.  They don’t get on the Bat phone and tell Commissioner Gordon what to do.   The 1001 app brings light to events, news, bids, contract and more.  The app itself is a transparent means to find out anything that is occurring with our union. If a member sees or hears something through the grapevine call the union or go to a meeting.  You’ll get an answer.  Before you ask please study the contract and our constitution which have both been posted on the app, website and online.  That’s transparency.

The election was an amazing catalyst of change for our union.  The company, USA Elections, was precise, professional and accurate.  As a lifelong election judge and poll watcher, their system should be used in America’s general elections.  The software and equipment was state of the art along with the superbly trained staff.  Their knowledge allowed the election to be recorded on a real time status.  It allowed union members to vote quickly, accurately and confidentially.  The entire process was transparent.

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One Union to Rule them All

The hashtag #1u is an amazing reminder that we are part of a Labor Movement, grown over 100 years. When we want something, we must share with our brothers and sisters.  If family isn’t your thing, then union may not be either.  Because here we share.  During the past four years, members knew that women, African-Americans and Latinos received more promotions that at any other time. From FSS to RCC and even a laborer turn superintendent, our membership is balancing out for all members. Our leadership is more diverse than ever before.  Though America didn’t believe a woman could be president, our union has decided it’s right for our progress.  For eight years we lived in a country that was devastated by a Great Recession that was cured by an African-American president. We have re-elected a strong African-American man that has taken us through recessions, investigations and the real threat of privatization successfully. He will be successful again.  As we shudder when we hear of the “Wall”, we’ve progressively elected a Latino Secretary-Treasurer for a second term. Why wouldn’t we want that in our union?  We the people run this country, we the people should represent us on the job.

Our Future

The future of your job is in your ability to be a good, contributing and confident member of your union family.  Infighting, gossip and lack of activism hurts us all.  Politicians that we need to vote for us, need our support in their events and in their elections.  They also need to see our strength in numbers as we can turn an entire ward orange.  Our future depends on our collective activism. If we don’t show our orange, they’ll show us the door.

LOCAL 1001 ELECTION RESULTS!

On Saturday, May 20, 2017, LiUNA Local 1001 held its Officer Election.

The Integrity Slate won all positions on the ballot. Brother Chianelli was duly elected to the position of Recording Secretary without opposition at the Nomination meeting on May 4, 2017.

The results of the election are as follows, winners are in bold.

President: Nicole Hayes   442

Bessie Redding   387

Vice President: Steven Marcucci   517

Linda Cribbs   310

Secretary/Treasurer: Victor Roa    494

Terry Coleman    335

Business Manager: James Ellis   455

Paul Reed     380

Sergeant-at-Arms: Mark Payne 456

John Reza 358

Auditors (3): Michelle Harris   460

                        David Morales     402

                         Lawrence Pardo   387*

Jorge Velazquez    370

George Chesniak    336

Bob Murphy    387*

*tie was broken by coin flip

Executive Board (2): Tasha Sanders   437

                                        David Torres  413

Larry Dunlevy  354

Michael Funches  375

Delegates to LDC (3): William Irving   469

                                          Tommy Chirillo  394

                                           Bob Chianelli      463

Ambrosio Medrano Jr.   271

Owen Cope   301

Jim Klockowski    284

Hector Maldonado   192

Job/Bid Announcement – Foreman of Laborers – DSS

Check out the bid in the Jobs section of our app and bid online before May 31, 2017

www.cityofchicago.org/CAREERS  

FOREMAN OF LABORERS : Job Number: 288903

JOB TITLE:   FOREMAN OF LABORER 

BID ANNOUNCEMENT

DEPARTMENT:  STREETS & SANITATION 

These positions are open to all current city employees covered under the terms of the City’s collective bargaining agreement with LABORERS INTERNATIONAL UNION OF NORTH AMERICA LOCAL 1001 (BARGAINING UNIT 54).   Only employees in City job titles in this bargaining unit are eligible to bid on this position.  

IF YOU ARE A CURRENT CITY EMPLOYEE AND WANT TO EXERCISE YOUR CONTRACTUAL RIGHTS TO BID, YOU MUST CHECK THE BOX ON THE CAREERS APPLICATION TITLED “ALREADY EMPLOYED BY THIS COMPANY”, CORRECTLY ENTER YOUR EMPLOYEE ID, AND SELECT THE CORRECT BARGAINING UNIT. 

YOU MUST USE THE EMPLOYEE NUMBER FOUND ON THE UPPER LEFT-HAND CORNER OF YOUR PAY CHECK STUB LABELED “PAYEE/EMPLOYEE NUMBER.”

(NO OTHER FORMAT OR SYSTEM CAN BE USED TO GET YOUR EMPLOYEE NUMBER). 

FAILURE TO CHECK THE “ALREADY EMPLOYED BY THIS COMPANY” BOX, ENTER YOUR EMPLOYEE ID, AND SELECT THE CORRECT BARGAINING UNIT WILL RESULT IN A REJECTED BID APPLICATION.   

Number of Positions: 1

Under general supervision, functions as a working supervisor over work crews, overseeing and supervising Laborers performing unskilled manual work of a physical nature at assigned maintenance, repair or sanitation jobs / work sites, and performs related duties as required.

Happy Mothers Day!

mothersdayliuns

Wishing all the hardworking  LiUNA Moms a very Happy Mothers Day, and to all the other Moms who made us the LiUNA men and women we are today!

HAPPY MOTHERS DAY!

Chicago adds graffiti-removal crews, trucks

By Leonor VivancoContact Reporter – Chicago Tribune

Chicago has added new graffiti-blasting trucks and crews to remove tagging reported on buildings and garages in neighborhoods in an effort to continue to get rid of graffiti in five days or less.

Eight new trucks, which cost a total of $552,000, use citric acid combined with high-pressure hot water to remove graffiti. Other trucks use baking soda to blast off graffiti from brick or stone and paint to cover up markings on metal and wood. Two trucks were retired, bringing the Streets and Sanitation fleet to 22 trucks, said spokeswoman Sara McGann.

The department shifted employees to its graffiti-removal operation from other tasks to add three new crews to its graffiti-removal program. Every day, 26 to 28 crews — each staffed with one or two employees — work to get rid of tagging, she said.

“It’s really to maintain the five-day-or-less removal time. We want to keep our city beautiful and free from vandalism,” said McGann, who added some new vehicles hit the street for the first time Tuesday. Quick removal helps the city deter vandalism, she said.

Requests made to the city to remove graffiti are down nearly 14 percent so far this year compared with the same period last year. For the first four months of the year, the city completed 33,931 removal requests citywide, down from 39,415 through April 30 last year, according to McGann.

Residents can report graffiti and request its removal by calling 311 or making a report on the city’s website.

Laborers’ are so much more than Sanitation workers

Once again one of our LiUNA Local 1001 brothers went above and beyond to help a college student who had been robbed during  an armed robbery recover their items.

As we have always said LiUNA members are the greatest, they go the extra mile every day and Brother Manolis, your LiUNA Local 1001 family is proud of you.

Keep up the great work everyone!

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A Message from General President O’Sullivan

Honor the Fallen.  Fight for the Living.
An Update from General President Terry O’Sullivan

Most of us can feel assured that after any given workday we’ll return safely to our homes and families.  Yet for too many men and women, the workday will bring a serious injury and even death on the job. That’s why this April 28, HonorDead.jpgknown as Workers Memorial Day in the United States and National Day of Mourning in Canada, is so important.

While jobsite safety programs have improved and helped curb the rise of death and injuries, the fact remains that in the U.S. and Canada 5,688 workers died on the job in 2015, according to the most recent data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety. The 1,110 recorded worker fatalities in the construction industry alone show that construction work is particularly dangerous. That is too many lives cut short and too many lost loved ones.

We know that, in addition to safety training programs, having a strong union such as LIUNA is one of the most effective ways to reduce safety incidents. When we have a voice, we are more free to speak out against jobsite hazards. Studies show that construction fatality rates are significantly lower where unions are strong.

We still have work to do – death or injury should never be the price of going to work for any worker.  So on this April 28, let us honor those who have fallen or been maimed while building our great countries.  Let us spread the word about the need for safer jobsites and workplaces by participating in April 28 commemoration events or by sharing information, which you can find on LIUNA’s social media sites.

And let’s continue to make our strong union even stronger so that the day will come when no one pays the ultimate price simply for going to work.

How to shoot yourself in the foot

Republican voting union members experience their own wages going down with Right-to-Work

by Brian Young

Across the country, anti-union forces like the Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) and the Koch Brothers have tried to sell the idea that so called Right to Work laws are actually good for workers.  Now a new study finds that Right to Work (RTW) laws not only lower the union rate in the state, but they also lower the overall wages.

A new report from the Illinois Economic Policy Institute looked at the effect that RTW laws in Michigan, Indiana and Wisconsin had, and compared the economic changes to 3 surrounding states with similar economies but no Right to Work laws; those states include Illinois, Ohio and Minnesota. What they found was striking.  The study, which looked at data from 2010-2016 found that in three states with collective bargaining, wages were 8% higher than the three RTW states.  The study also found that these laws caused a 2% drop in the overall union rates in the state. This study isn’t an anomaly either.  Studies have consistently found that RTW reduces employees’ wages by 2-4% on average.

So, who was hit hardest by the move to rid these states of collective bargaining? Workers in construction saw the biggest pay cut.  The study found that their hourly wages dropped almost 6%.  Police officers and fire fighters also saw pay cuts of 3%.  Industries that have workers who went to college but don’t have advanced degrees also faced 3% pay cuts. These pay cuts are especially disturbing because these jobs and education levels are often pathway positions to the middle class.

While middle class employees are making less, owners and management have not been effected.  Over the last 6 years their wages have stayed the same, while almost everyone else has seen them decrease.  The same people who sold RTW as good for the worker are the only ones doing okay from it.  Another study from Hofstra University found that when RTW is implemented in a state, 2% of the income in the state is redistributed from the employees to the owners.

Interestingly, the people who were hit hardest by RTW were the union members who were most likely to vote for these anti-union politicians.  Construction, Police, Fire and Teachers all saw wage cuts that were greater than the money they saved in union dues. Construction workers can expect their wages to fall even further in Wisconsin as the state has recently gotten rid of Project Labor Agreements (PLA’s) that require public works projects to pay a prevailing wage.

Over the last few years, RTW has expanded out of the South and into the Midwest.  Now Trump is pushing a national RTW law.

Make America Great Again.

TRANSFER REQUESTS SANITATION/GENERAL LABORERS

LOCAL 1001 has identified several positions for Sanitation/General Laborers which need to be filled prior to the open transfer period of the CBA. In order to best serve our membership we have worked to have those vacancies filled on or around May 1, 2017.

Below you will find a posting from the Department of Streets and Sanitation explaining where, when and how to make sure your transfer is submitted. Please note the timelines for submittal.

pdf version of posting 

Transfer Request for San Laborers General Laborers - Rodent Street Ops

CHICAGO AREA FOOD DRIVE

Now is a great time to show how much the brothers and sisters of LiUNA care. Let’s all help those who are in need and feed the hungry.

Please see the flyer below and share it with everyone you know.

Click on the flyer below to dowload a pdf copy to print and thank you for your particiapation in this great event.

fooddrive2017

ONE OF OUR VERY OWN!

The value of the hard working men and women of LiUNA Local 1001 extends far beyond what their normal every day job duties are. And the following is just another stunning example of what we our membership does.

On an early morning while brother Randy Mosby was servicing one of his units Ms. McKellvin wandered out of her home in a daze after just finding her disabled son deceased.

Brother Mosbey observed her walking in a state of shock  down the block. She recalled that she was so upset that she could not speak and was only able to motion to Brother Mosbey that something was wrong inside of her home. 

He was so concerned by her condition that he went into the house to try and find out what was wrong and immediately called 911.

She was so moved that Brother Mosby stayed with her and consoled her until help arrived that she personally called the Commissioner of Streets and Sanitation’s office to commend him for going above and beyond his duty as a Sanitation Laborer of the City of Chicago.

She stated Brother Mosby was her guardian angel that day and wanted him to know how much she appreciated what he did for her and her family. She said she will never forget his act of kindess. 

We are proud of Brother Mosby’s actions and so many of the regular day in and day out things that our membership does which often goes unnoticed.

Keep up the great work everyone, LiUNA Proud!

File Apr 17, 1 18 05 PM

Job/Bid Announcement AOS I

Job Number: 288300

AIRPORT OPERATIONS SUPERVISOR I

CHICAGO DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION
 

BID/JOB ANNOUNCEMENT

 

IF YOU ARE A CURRENT CITY EMPLOYEE AND WANT TO EXERCISE YOUR CONTRACTUAL RIGHTS TO BID, YOU MUST APPLY ON THE BID ONLY SITE AT: www.cityofchicago.org/CAREERS  

(Once the website opens, scroll down and click on the button titled “Bid Opportunities.”)

IN ADDITION, YOU MUST CHECK THE BOX ON THE CAREERS APPLICATION TITLED “ALREADY EMPLOYED BY THIS COMPANY”, CORRECTLY ENTER YOUR EMPLOYEE ID, AND SELECT THE CORRECT BARGAINING UNIT.  YOU MUST USE THE EMPLOYEE NUMBER FOUND ON THE UPPER LEFT-HAND CORNER OF YOUR PAY CHECK STUB LABELED “PAYEE/EMPLOYEE NUMBER.”

(NO OTHER FORMAT OR SYSTEM CAN BE USED TO OBTAIN YOUR EMPLOYEE NUMBER). 

FAILURE TO CHECK THE “ALREADY EMPLOYED BY THIS COMPANY” BOX, ENTER YOUR EMPLOYEE ID, AND SELECT THE CORRECT BARGAINING UNIT WILL RESULT IN A REJECTED BID APPLICATION.

These positions are open to the general public and to all current city employees covered under the terms of the City’s collective bargaining agreement with LABORERS INTERNATIONAL UNION OF N.A., LOCAL 1001 (BARGAINING UNIT #54). 

 
NUMBER OF VACANCIES: 7
 
ESSENTIAL DUTIES:
  • Visually inspect the condition and maintenance of airfield facilities and surrounding perimeter (e.g., runways, taxiways, ramps, safety areas) to ensure surfaces are free of safety hazards, obstructions and debris and in good physical condition
  • Request emergency repairs and monitor work crews on the airfield performing work such as pavement repairs (e.g. potholes), removal of debris and other safety hazards from airfield, and the repair of airfield lighting and signage equipment  
  • Prepare documentation and reports of airfield inspections, findings and irregularities and maintain daily log of activities / operations logs 
  • Issue and cancel Notice to Airman (NOTAMS) to provide current information on aviation and airfield conditions including the opening and closing of runways to FAA air traffic control 
  • Monitor weather service reports, check surface conditions and temperatures and advise city personnel, contractors and other aviation personnel of weather conditions 
  • Assist senior level Airport Operations Supervisors II in implementing procedures to control access and movement of personnel on the airfield, closing and opening runways and other airfield areas, and approving proper placement of barricades
  • Act as a liaison to the FAA, airport administration and the operations tower, monitoring and directing the reporting and dissemination of information relating to construction work, emergency situations and other incidents affecting aircraft movement and field conditions
  • Assist in providing appropriate level of response in emergency situations including monitoring responders, taking actions to ensure operational integrity of airfield and maintaining communications with airport management and the operations tower
  • Respond to inquiries regarding the status of airfield facilities and maintenance issues
  • Coordinate snow removal operations on the airfield and conduct runway and taxiway assessments after cleaning procedures  
  • Take appropriate action to clear aircraft operating areas and airfield of wildlife hazards
  • And, other job related duties as assigned
CHICAGO DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION

Location: O’Hare International Airport, City Atrium

Shift: Varies

Hours/Days Off: Vary

 

This position requires the selected incumbent to be available nights, weekends, and holidays based on operational needs. In addition, outside work/inspection is required with possible exposure to fumes, dust, noise, and work in all weather conditions.

 
THIS POSITION IS IN THE CAREER SERVICE.
Qualifications

 Two years of airfield operations work experience, or an equivalent combination of education, training, and experience. A valid State of Illinois driver’s license is required. Must obtain airfield certification within six months of hire.

Work environment requires the ability to operate an SUV and truck and requires the ability to climb two flights of stairs through a narrow passageway. Some lifting (up to 25 pounds) is required. 

Education & Employment Verification: Please be advised that if you are selected to be hired you must provide, upon request, adequate information regarding your educational and employment history as it relates to the qualifications of the position for which you are applying.  If you received your degree internationally, all international transcripts/diploma must be accompanied by a Foreign Credential Evaluation.  If the City of Chicago cannot verify this information, any offer extended to you will be withdrawn and you will not be hired. 

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, ABILITIES:

  • applicable federal (e.g., FAA), state, and local laws, regulations, and guidelines
  • airport operations methods, practices, and procedures
  • airfield inspection and maintenance methods, practices, and procedures
  • airport emergency procedures
  • supervisory methods, practices, and procedures
  • applicable City and department policies, procedures, rules, and regulations

NOTE:  To be considered for this position you must provide information about your educational background and your work experience. You must include job titles, dates of employment, and specific job duties.  (If you are a current City employee, Acting Up cannot be considered.)  If you fail to provide this information at the time you submit your application, it will be incomplete and you will not be considered for this position.  There are three ways to provide the information: 1) you may attach a resume; 2) you may paste a resume; or 3) you can complete the online resume field.

 

NOTE:  You must provide your transcripts or diploma, professional license, or training certificates at time of processing, if applicable.  You must also provide your valid U.S. driver’s license at time of processing of processing.

 
SELECTION REQUIREMENTS:

This position requires applicants to complete an interview. The interviewed candidate(s) possessing the qualifications best suited to fulfill the responsibilities of the position will be selected.

 
 
Note: Candidates selected for hire must pass an airport background check and a Security Treat Assessment (STA).
 

Preference will be given to candidates possessing the following:

  • Proficiency with the Federal Aviation Regulation Part 139 Certification of Airport
  • Work experience performing airfield operations or in the aviation industry at a commercial airport
  • Proficiency with MS Office software
VETERANS PREFERENCE NOTE:  The City of Chicago offers Veterans Preference to both current, active military personnel AND military personnel who have served in the Armed Forces of the United States and have received an honorable or general discharge.  Eligible candidates must have at least six months of active duty documented.  In order to receive the veterans preference, candidates need to indicate whether or not they are a veteran by answering “yes” or “no” to the question on the online application that asks, “Are you currently serving on active duty for at least six months in the Armed Forces of the United States OR have you served in the Armed Forces of the United States on active duty for at least six months and received an honorable or general discharge?”  In addition, you must attach documentation to verify your military service.  For veterans, you must attach a copy of your DD214 to your online application which includes character of service status OR a letter from the United States Veterans Administration on official stationary stating dates of service and character of service.  For active military personnel, you must attach a letter from your Commanding Officer on official stationary verifying your active duty, length of service, and character of service in the Armed Forces of the United States AND a copy of your military ID to your online application.  Failure to answer the question and attach the required documentation will result in you not being considered for the Veterans Preference.
 

Evaluation:  Your initial evaluation will be based on information provided on the application form and documents submitted with the application. Applications must be submitted by the individual applicant.  No second party applications will be accepted. 

 

Residency Requirement: All employees of the City of Chicago must be actual residents of the City as outlined in 2-152-050 of the City of Chicago Municipal Code. Proof of residency will be required.

If you would like to request a reasonable accommodation due to disability or pregnancy in order to participate in the application processplease contact the City of Chicago, Department of Human Resources, at 312-744-4976 (voice) or 312-744-5035. (TTY).  Please be prepared to provide information in support of your reasonable accommodation request. 

 

ALL REFERENCES TO POLITICAL SPONSORSHIP OR RECOMMENDATION MUST BE OMITTED FROM ANY AND ALL APPLICATION MATERIALS SUBMITTED FOR CITY EMPLOYMENT.

The City of Chicago is an Equal Employment Opportunity and Military Friendly Employer.

Unposting Date: Apr 29, 2017, 11:59:00 PM

BU: 54 Salary: $60,372.00 |   Pay Basis:Yearly

 www.cityofchicago.org/CAREERS

DSS CSR/CMAT/KRONOS Training

Date: Saturday, April 29, 2017

Topic: Customer Service Requests (CSRs)/311 Complaints – How To Enter Them, Look Them Up, and

           Close Them Out; Management Reports including Alley Times

Time:  09:00 hr – 11:00 hr

Location: City Hall Room 1107

Trainer/Contact Person: John Dunn

RSVP: Email John Dunn at John.Dunn@cityofchicago.org no later than Thursday, April 27, 2017

———————

Date: Saturday, TBD, 2017

Topic: The Basic Concepts of Chicago Mobile Asset Tracking (CMAT) and Microsoft Word 365

Time:  09:00 hr – 11:00 hr

Location: City Hall Room 1107

Trainer/Contact Person: Cesar Salgado

RSVP: Email Cesar Salgado at Cesar.Salgado@cityofchicago.org no later than Thursday, TBD, 2017

 ———————— 

Date: Saturday, May 13, 2017

Topic: The Basic Concepts of KRONOS/Time and Attendance System for Editing

Time:  09:00 hr – 11:00 hr

Location: City Hall Room 1107

Trainer/Contact Person: Steve Morales

RSVP: Email Steve Morales at Steve.Morales@cityofchicago.org no later than Thursday, May 11, 2017

 ———————-

Parking:           Parking is available at the Streets and Sanitation Lower Randolph facility located at

351 East Lower Randolph or local garages.

All training sessions are voluntary and attendees will not be paid for attendance.  All attendees must

RSVP to the appropriate trainer by the close of business on the Thursday before the training.

 

Classes are open to City of Chicago Department of Streets & Sanitation Employees only

JOB/BID ANNOUNCEMENT ASST. CHIEF AIRPORT OPERATIONS SUPVSR.

APPLY ONLINE HERE: www.cityofchicago.org/CAREERS

ASST CHIEF AIRPORT OPERATIONS SUPVSR 

Job Number: 288302

BID/JOB ANNOUNCEMENT

IN ADDITION, YOU MUST CHECK THE BOX ON THE CAREERS APPLICATION TITLED “ALREADY EMPLOYED BY THIS COMPANY”, CORRECTLY ENTER YOUR EMPLOYEE ID, AND SELECT THE CORRECT BARGAINING UNIT.  YOU MUST USE THE EMPLOYEE NUMBER FOUND ON THE UPPER LEFT-HAND CORNER OF YOUR PAY CHECK STUB LABELED “PAYEE/EMPLOYEE NUMBER.”

(NO OTHER FORMAT OR SYSTEM CAN BE USED TO OBTAIN YOUR EMPLOYEE NUMBER). 

FAILURE TO CHECK THE “ALREADY EMPLOYED BY THIS COMPANY” BOX, ENTER YOUR EMPLOYEE ID, AND SELECT THE CORRECT BARGAINING UNIT WILL RESULT IN A REJECTED BID APPLICATION.

These positions are open to the general public and to all current city employees covered under the terms of the City’s collective bargaining agreement with LABORERS INTERNATIONAL UNION OF N.A., LOCAL 1001 (BARGAINING UNIT #54). 

 
NUMBER OF VACANCIES: 1
 

Under general supervision, the class functions as a duty supervisor on an assigned shift, supervising airport operations staff responsible for inspecting airfield facilities (e.g., runways, taxiways, ramps, surface lighting) for irregularities, safety hazards, and general physical condition, and responding to incidents affecting airfield and terminal operations, and performs related duties as required.

 
ESSENTIAL DUTIES: 
  • Coordinates and supervises inspection of airfields, issuance and cancellation of Notices to Airmen (NOTAMs) on airfield status, and receiving and relaying of airfield maintenance requests 
  • Assigns, supervises and monitors the work activities of airport operations staff
  • Oversees and participates in the inspection of airfield facilities (e.g., runways, taxiways, ramps) in compliance with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations
  • Coordinates airfield repair and maintenance activities to ensure minimal disruptions to airfield traffic
  • Orders runway closings and openings and initiates corrective measures in response to irregularities found during inspections to ensure proper maintenance of airfield facilities
  • Notifies departmental management of atypical airfield situations requiring their attention 
  • Implements initial and recurrent training programs for airport operations staff
  • Determines maintenance priorities (e.g., snow removal, grass cutting) in accordance with FAA regulations and departmental standards
  • Ensures the timely and accurate maintenance of records concerning airfield activities (e.g., service requests, snow removal operations) and prepares related reports
  • Responds to inquiries regarding the status of airfield facilities and maintenance issues
  • During emergency situations, provides airfield access assistance to municipal and federal agencies, as required
  • And, other job related duties as required
CHICAGO DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION

Location: O’Hare International Airport, City Atrium

Shift: Varies

Hours/Days Off: Vary

This position requires the selected incumbent to be available nights, weekends, and holidays based on operational needs. 

THIS POSITION IS IN THE CAREER SERVICE.
 
Qualifications

 Graduation from an accredited college or university with a Bachelor’s in degree business Administration, Aviation Management, or a directly related field, plus two years of airfield operations experience, of which one year is in a supervisory role related to the responsibilities of the position; or an equivalent combination of education, training and experience.

A valid State of Illinois driver’s license is required. Must obtain airfield certification within six months of hire. 

WORKING CONDITIONS:
  • General office environment
  • Exposure to outdoor weather conditions
  • Exposure to loud noise
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS:
  • Some lifting (up to 25 pounds)
  • Ability to staircases, ladders, and/or step stools
  • Ability to operate automotive vehicles and associated equipment
Education & Employment Verification: Please be advised that if you are selected to be hired you must provide, upon request, adequate information regarding your educational and employment history as it relates to the qualifications of the position for which you are applying.  If you received your degree internationally, all international transcripts/diploma must be accompanied by a Foreign Credential Evaluation.  If the City of Chicago cannot verify this information, any offer extended to you will be withdrawn and you will not be hired.
 

NOTE:  To be considered for this position you must provide information about your educational background and your work experience. You must include job titles, dates of employment, and specific job duties.  (If you are a current City employee, Acting Up cannot be considered.)  If you fail to provide this information at the time you submit your application, it will be incomplete and you will not be considered for this position.  There are three ways to provide the information: 1) you may attach a resume; 2) you may paste a resume; or 3) you can complete the online resume field. 

NOTE:  You must provide your transcripts or diploma, professional license, or training certificates at time of processing, if applicable.  You must also provide your valid U.S. driver’s license at time of processing of processing. 

SELECTION REQUIREMENTS:

This position requires applicants to successfully pass a skills assessment test and complete an interview. Test results will be sent out by the Department of Human Resources after test results have been compiled and analyzed. Applicants who receive a passing score on the test will be selected to interview. The interviewed candidate(s) receiving a passing score on the test and possessing the qualifications best suited to fulfill the responsibilities of the position will be selected for hire.

Note: Candidates selected for hire must pass an airport background check and a Security Treat Assessment (STA).

Preference will be given to candidates possessing the following:

  • Previous work experience involving monitoring weather information reports, preparing/issuing field reports, and supervising snow removal
  • Supervisory experience related to the position
  • Proficiency in preparation of NOTAM reports
  • Knowledge of MS Office applications
VETERANS PREFERENCE NOTE:  The City of Chicago offers Veterans Preference to both current, active military personnel AND military personnel who have served in the Armed Forces of the United States and have received an honorable or general discharge.  Eligible candidates must have at least six months of active duty documented.  In order to receive the veterans preference, candidates need to indicate whether or not they are a veteran by answering “yes” or “no” to the question on the online application that asks, “Are you currently serving on active duty for at least six months in the Armed Forces of the United States OR have you served in the Armed Forces of the United States on active duty for at least six months and received an honorable or general discharge?”  In addition, you must attach documentation to verify your military service.  For veterans, you must attach a copy of your DD214 to your online application which includes character of service status OR a letter from the United States Veterans Administration on official stationary stating dates of service and character of service.  For active military personnel, you must attach a letter from your Commanding Officer on official stationary verifying your active duty, length of service, and character of service in the Armed Forces of the United States AND a copy of your military ID to your online application.  Failure to answer the question and attach the required documentation will result in you not being considered for the Veterans Preference.
 

Evaluation:  Your initial evaluation will be based on information provided on the application form and documents submitted with the application. Applications must be submitted by the individual applicant.  No second party applications will be accepted. 

Residency Requirement:  All employees of the City of Chicago must be actual residents of the City as outlined in 2-152-050 of the City of Chicago Municipal Code. Proof of residency will be required.

If you would like to request a reasonable accommodation due to disability or pregnancy in order to participate in the application processplease contact the City of Chicago, Department of Human Resources, at 312-744-4976 (voice) or 312-744-5035. (TTY).  Please be prepared to provide information in support of your reasonable accommodation request.  

ALL REFERENCES TO POLITICAL SPONSORSHIP OR RECOMMENDATION MUST BE OMITTED FROM ANY AND ALL APPLICATION MATERIALS SUBMITTED FOR CITY EMPLOYMENT.

The City of Chicago is an Equal Employment Opportunity and Military Friendly Employer.

 Job Posting : Apr 10, 2017, 12:00:00 AM | 

Unposting Date : Apr 24, 2017, 11:59:00 PM

BU: 54 Salary: $72,660.00 |   Pay Basis:Yearly
APPLY ONLINE HERE: www.cityofchicago.org/CAREER

Repealing prevailing wage laws hurts construction workers

For more than 40 years, big business and the Republican party have teamed up to drive down the wages of construction workers by attacking their unions, passing so-called “right-to-work laws”, and weakening or repealing prevailing wage laws— which protect construction wages from downward pressure. They have, unfortunately, been very successful. Construction wages are lower today  than they were in 1970, despite 40 years of economic growth and a higher national income.

The real average hourly earnings of production/nonsupervisory construction workers were $26.17 in 1970, $26.00 in 1980, and $23.91 in 1990. Construction workers’ hourly earnings bottomed out at $22.97 in 1993 but have never fully recovered from their 1970 peak and were only $25.97 in 2016.

State law changes pushed by business groups and enacted by Republican-dominated legislatures have been a major factor in the decline of construction wages. Since 1979, prevailing wage laws have been a particular target. Without prevailing wage laws—which require contractors to bid and pay at least the average wage in their locality when working on public construction contracts— contractors can cut wages to win bids, rather than competing on the basis of efficiency and management skills, material costs, or the productivity of their workforce.

Though they have protected construction workers’ wages for decades, 20 states have removed prevailing wage laws and several more have weakened them. Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah, Virginia, and West Virginia do not have any prevailing wage laws. Wisconsin no longer applies prevailing wage protections to local public construction projects, but still does for state highway projects. Arkansas and Missouri are currently both debating repeal.

Unsurprisingly, median construction wages are far lower (21.9 percent) in the 20 states that have no prevailing wage law than in the states that still do protect prevailing wages. Even after taking into account cost-of-living differences, median wages are almost 7 percent lower in states where there is no prevailing wage law. If state officials want to hit construction workers in the pocketbook, while folding to business interests, repealing prevailing wage laws is an effective way to do it.

TABLE 1

Median hourly wages for construction and extraction employees, by states with prevailing wage laws, May 2015

Hourly median wage Cost-of-living-adjusted median hourly wage (BEA RPP) Cost-of-living-adjusted median hourly wage (MERIC)
States with prevailing wage laws  $ 22.52  $ 22.40  $ 20.67
States without prevailing wage laws  $ 18.47  $ 19.82  $ 19.37
Percent higher median wage in states with prevailing wage laws 21.9% 13.0% 6.7%

Note: Construction occupations make up about 95.2 percent of the construction and extraction occupation category.

Source: EPI analysis of Occupational Employment Statistics data, Bureau of Economic Analysis Regional Price Parities (BEA RPP) data, and Missouri Economic Research and Information Center (MERIC) data

 

FIGURE B

Median hourly wages for construction and extraction employees, by states with prevailing wage laws, May 2015

States with prevailing wage laws States without prevailing wage laws
Hourly median wage  $ 22.52  $ 18.47
Cost-of-living-adjusted median hourly wage (BEA RPP)  $ 22.40  $ 19.82
Cost-of-living-adjusted median hourly wage (MERIC)  $ 20.67  $ 19.37

Note: Construction occupations make up about 95.2 percent of the construction and extraction occupation category.

Source: EPI analysis of Occupational Employment Statistics data, Bureau of Economic Analysis Regional Price Parities (BEA RPP) data, and Missouri Economic Research and Information Center (MERIC) data

WELCOME TO THE NEW CLASS OF GENERAL LABORERS

We would like all of our LiUNA brothers and sisters to welcome today’s graduating class of General Laborers.

As they have successfully completed their training at the Chicagoland Laborers Training Center and will now be working along side their prould Local 1001 brothers and sisters.

Welcome aboard and we wish you a long and prosperous career as a member of LiUNA! Feel the Power.

BID/JOB OPPORTUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT

DEPARTMENT OF STREETS AND SANITATION

BID/JOB OPPORTUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT

VACANCIES: 3
   
JOB TITLE:  SANITATION CLERK     TITLE CODE: 0441
 
2017 SALARY:   $40,812.00 PAY GRADE: V10

 These positions are open to the general public and to all current city employees covered under the terms of the City’s collective bargaining agreement with County, Municipal Supervisors and Foreman Local 1001 (BARGAINING UNIT 54).  

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS 

Two years of clerical work experience; or an equivalent combination of education, training, and experience

DUTIES: Under supervision, performs clerical and payroll duties in an assigned district office; maintains records of a district’s refuse collection activities (e.g., daily route assignments and units completed,  tonnage collected by individual refuse trucks, and bulk, compost, and litter basket pick up assignments); prepares various reports (e.g., manpower distribution and absentee reports, daily truck and hired equipment allocations, street cleaning activity reports); contacts operations control center on a daily basis to report crew shortages, route completion, and tonnage collected; maintains color coded maps to track daily work progress of crews throughout the districts; reviews daily timesheets and timekeeping records for staff assigned to the districts; maintains records and assist with preparation of overtime cost reports; prepares various personnel forms (e.g., accident reports, payroll action forms, specialty rates); receives requests from residents for sanitation services and forwards to all supervisors within a division; operates a computer terminal to input and update complaints and service requests received from residents; maintains a log of complaints or service requests forwarded through the Division Superintendent’s office; provides area police district with information about areas scheduled for street cleaning; maintains inventory records of tools and materials issued to the district; prepares requisitions to order tools, materials, and office supplies as directed; attends training classes to keep updated on City services, as required; provides residents with information regarding events and scheduled activities (e.g., spring and fall clean-up, green events, street cleaning season); prepares and assists with snow sheets allocations during snow events; performs related duties as required

LOCATION: Department of Streets and Sanitation HOURS: Varies 
SHIFTS: Varies DAYS OFF: Saturday & Sunday

PLEASE NOTE: The complete Bid Announcement with application, attachment, and selection requirements are posted online.  Please follow the directions in the box below on how to apply online. 

BID APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE NO LATER THAN:

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5, 2017

APPLICATION PROCESS:

IF YOU ARE A CURRENT CITY EMPLOYEE AND WANT TO EXERCISE YOUR CONTRACTUAL RIGHTS TO BID, YOU MUST APPLY ON THE BID ONLY SITE AT: www.cityofchicago.org/CAREERS

IN ADDITION, YOU MUST CHECK THE BOX ON THE CAREERS APPLICATION TITLED “ALREADY EMPLOYED BY THIS COMPANY”, CORRECTLY ENTER YOUR EMPLOYEE ID, AND SELECT THE CORRECT BARGAINING UNIT.  YOUR EMPLOYEE ID CAN BE FOUND ON THE UPPER LEFT-HAND CORNER OF THE PAY CHECK STUB. 

FAILURE TO CHECK THE “ALREADY EMPLOYED BY THIS COMPANY” BOX, ENTER YOUR EMPLOYEE ID, AND SELECT THE CORRECT BARGAINING UNIT WILL RESULT IN A REJECTED BID APPLICATION. 

Job/Bid Announcement Airport Maintenance Foreman O’Hare

BID ANNOUNCEMENT #:  085-2017-003                                                                                      

JOB TITLE:  AIRPORT MAINTENANCE FOREMAN     TITLE CODE:   7005

VACANCIES: 1

PAY GRADE:   PR2017 SALARY: $73,985.00/YEAR

This position is covered under the City’s collective bargaining agreement with the  COUNTY MUNICIPALEMPLOYEES’, SUPERVISORS’, AND FOREMAN’S UNION 1001 (BU#54).

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

Two years of work experience in grounds and building maintenance work for a large facility or commercial building.  A valid State of Illinois driver’s license is required.  Must pass a Ground motor Vehicle Operating Regulation Basic Driving test administrated by the Chicago Department of Aviation (CDA) within six months of hire.

See our Jobs/Bids tab in the app to get more info.

Rauner asks state Supreme Court to get involved in fight with union

This is what an anti-union politician means to Illinois, it’s not just some other state’s problem now! If they can do it to them then who’s next?
—————————
By Kim Geiger – Chicago Tribune

Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner tried to jump-start a stalled labor dispute Friday, asking the Illinois Supreme Court to allow him to impose his preferred contract terms on the state’s largest public worker union.

Earlier this month, the 4th District Appellate Court in central Illinois prevented Rauner from trying to implement his last, best and final contract offer until after the court has decided an appeal by the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees union.

Rauner on Friday asked the state’s highest court to bypass the usual appeal process and take the case on now. In a filing to the Supreme Court, the governor’s lawyers argued that the delay caused by the appeal was costing the state money. They warned that a prolonged legal battle could prevent the Rauner administration from setting up a new health insurance system for state employees — a plan designed to reap savings for the state by passing a greater share of the costs of health insurance onto workers.

Briefs in the appeal in the case aren’t due until June, Rauner’s attorneys said, meaning the case is likely to drag beyond the state’s May 1 deadline to open an enrollment period for state workers’ health insurance.

The union had challenged a ruling by the Illinois Labor Relations Board that found Rauner and the union to be at impasse in their contract talks. That stage in negotiations would allow the governor to press forward with his preferred terms and put the union in the position of having to accept them or go on strike. AFSCME appealed to the court, which temporarily halted implementation of Rauner’s contract. The temporary stop became a permanent one in early March.

Meanwhile, AFSCME announced in February that its members had voted overwhelmingly in favor of going on strike if necessary to resist Rauner’s contract terms. The vote was intended to give the union greater leverage in its battle with Rauner.

Rauner’s lawyers, in their filing to the Supreme Court, alluded to the possibility of a strike as they argued that both sides should be free to use the tools at their disposal to resolve the dispute. Having the issue tied up in court causes a costly delay, they wrote.

“Continuing the current situation in which the parties are precluded from exercising their economic weapons for multiple months while the appeal remains in the Fourth District and then appealed to the Supreme Court is simply not tenable and will only further harm the public,” the filing reads.

The administration asked the high court to lift the stay preventing Rauner from installing his contract terms — particularly the health insurance portion.

“After 67 days of negotiation, the Administration presented AFSCME with a contract that reflects our last, best, and final offer,” Rauner General Counsel Dennis Murashko said in a statement announcing the administration’s request. “This is as far as we can go, and it is time to implement it. Every day we don’t costs our taxpayers more than $2 million, which is why we are asking the Illinois Supreme Court to resolve this case quickly.”

AFSCME Spokesman Anders Lindall argues that the appeals court has already signaled that there was a likelihood the union would prevail in its legal challenge of the impasse ruling.

“Instead of wasting more time and money in the courts, Governor Rauner should simply do his job and negotiate with our union,” Lindall said. “State workers are willing to do their part, but Bruce Rauner is so blinded by his anti-union animosity that he refuses to compromise.”

Rauner and the union are at odds over worker pay, health care costs and rules governing outsourcing. Rauner wants a wage freeze with bonuses to be paid to employees based on a merit system, while AFSCME originally sought a 2 percent pay raise in the first contract year followed by 3 percent increases for the following years.

On health care, Rauner is seeking to significantly increase the worker-paid share of health care costs. AFSCME wanted to add benefits without increasing the cost to workers. Rauner also wants to delete provisions that would restrict the administration’s ability to subcontract, and he wants overtime pay to kick in after 40 hours have been worked, rather than the current 37.5-hour threshold. AFSCME has objected to both ideas.

How the Decline of Unions Has Caused Inequality to Rise in Each Midwest State

A new report finds that union decline has resulted in economic redistribution from workers to owners.

A new study released today by the Midwest Economic Policy Institute and the Project for Middle Class Renewal at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign illustrates the effect of union decline on state economies across the Midwest.

Full report: Union Decline and Economic Redistribution: A Report on Twelve Midwest States

As unionization rates fall, smaller shares of economic value go to Labor (workers’ earnings) and higher shares are captured by Capital (corporate profits, owners’ earnings, capital gains, and machinery).

The figure below shows all the data analyzed for 12 Midwest states from 1997 to 2014.

UnionDecline1

  • Unmistakably, as the union coverage rate increases from left to right, labor’s share of the state economy goes up and capital’s share of the economy goes down.
  • However, since unionization has been declining, Midwest states have “moved left” on the graph, resulting in lower labor shares of the economy – with capital capturing new economic wealth.

The largest union declines in the Midwest have occurred in Michigan and Wisconsin, where “right-to-work” laws have been passed.

“Right-to-work” laws are government regulations which prohibit workers and employers from negotiating specific types of private contracts. “Right to work” has been found to significantly reduce union membership. Accordingly, economic research consistently shows that “right-to-work” reduces worker earnings by 3-4% on average but also increases owner income by 2%, resulting in a transfer of income from workers to owners with “little ‘trickle-down’ to the largely non-unionized workforce in these states.”

UnionDecline2

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Ultimately, the Midwest Economic Policy Institute and the University of Illinois estimate that union decline accounted for approximately two-fifths (42%) of the overall drop in labor’s share of economic output across the Midwest from 1997 to 2014.

UnionDecline4

Below are graphics illustrating the relationship between unionization and the labor/capital split in five of the 12 states analyzed:

Unions help workers take home a larger share of the economic value they create. As unionization has declined across the Midwest, economic output has clearly been redistributed from workers to owners.


For the full report, please click here.

ATTENTION GENERAL LABORERS’

In preparation for upcoming Contract negotiations and to address questions about General Laborers’ who are reaching Career Service status, LiUNA Local 1001 will conduct meetings for the General Laborers’ on the following dates.

Tuesday,  March 14, 2017 at 3:30 p.m.

Wednesday, March 15, 2017  at 3:30 p.m.

At

LiUNA Local 1001 Union Hall

323 S. Ashland Ave.

Chicago, IL 60607 

These meetings are for General Laborers’ ONLY!

Union membership in Illinois matches record low

For all those who say it can’t happen here or never in Illinois, it is and it can! If you still think Right to Work and other anti-union legislation doesn’t affect you read this. 

 

WGN Webdesk

CHICAGO — Union membership in Illinois matched an historic low in 2016.
According to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, 14.5 percent of wage and salary workers in the state were in a union last year.

That’s down from 15.2 percent from the previous year, and ties the record low set in 2007.

But, it’s also slightly stronger than the national average of 10.7 percent in 2016 and 11.1 percent in 2015.

Illinois’ average has exceeded national levels since state comparisons began in 1989.

The highest union membership was recorded in 1993 with 21 percent.

To read the  Bureau of Labor report click here.

Congratulations to today’s class of General Laborers’

We would like to congratulate and welcome our new brothers and sisters to the LiUNA Local 1001 family.

These brothers and sisters have successfully completed their initial General Laborer training class and will now join the ranks of the over 2,000 Local 1001 members working for the City of Chicago.

Welcome aboard!

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Local 1001 President Hayes honored with Outstanding Achievement in Workforce and Labor

On Tuesday, February 28th, Illinois State Treasurer Frerichs hosted an event to celebrate Black History Month. The event which took place at the James R. Thompson Center honored great leaders in the community, elected officials and labor leaders. Among those honored was Nicole “Nikki” Hayes, President of LiUNA Local 1001. Proving once again that LiUNA is in the forefront of not only organized labor but in our state, city and our community’s across the United States and Canada. Keep up the great work everyone!

Check out the video in the video section of the LiUNA Local 1001 app or on youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rIywBbe6Ac&feature=youtu.be